Tag Archives: abc. cbs. msnbc

WARNING! This Is Very Disturbing

faceI guess every since there have been black people there have been those who are different. One of my subscribers sent me this chilling video and all I can say is this guy takes different to a whole-nother realm! I’ve been taught and affirmed by definition that “insanity is doing the same thing you’ve always done and getting the same result”. I don’t believe that describes sufficiently to what is going on in the mind of this guy. This can guy can only be described as a “house nigger” and that is being kind!!!

The insanity of some people, like this guy, that its very frightening. This is why we must teach our children the true history of our people or they could end up like this guy. And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…

VERY DISTURBING!!! 


The One And Only

On October 1, 1945, the world was gifted with a singer/songwriter/keyboardist best known for his duets with Roberta Flack, Donny Hathaway. Donny fused R&B, gospel, jazz, classical, and rock strains in a modestly successful solo career. He was raised in St. Louis by his grandmother, Martha Pitts, a professional gospel singer. From the age of three, Hathaway accompanied her on tours, billed as the Nation’s Youngest Gospel Singer. He attended Howard University in Washington, DC on a fine-arts scholarship.

He worked as a producer and arranger for artists such as Aretha Franklin and the Staple Singers. After serving as the band director the Impressions, he recorded the single “I Thank You” for Curtis Mayfield’s label and sang backup with the Mayfield Singers. His first single “The Ghetto, Part 1” reached #23 on the charts. After recording several more singles and an album, Donny recorded “You’ve Got a Friend” with Roberta Flack. Their single “Where Is the Love?” reached #5 on the charts & earned them a Grammy Award.

He sang the theme song for the television program “Maude” and was hired by Quincy Jones to score the soundtrack for the 1972 film “Come Back Charleston Blue.” In 1973, reportedly suffering from periods of depression, his partnership with Flack deteriorated and Hathaway faded into relative obscurity. Five years later, he recorded “The Closer I Get to You” with Flack. This was their biggest hit & reached #2 on the charts as well as earned them another Grammy nomination.

Gone too soon, but he left a profound footprint upon the souls of mankind. We loved you Brother Donny and miss the gift you shared with the world but you will never be forgotten. Rest In Peace!

Listen to the music I’ve added; trust and believe it will warm you heart. And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…

Put Your Hand In The Hand

Young, Gifted, And Black

What’s Goin On

“Just a Season”

AMAZON

Legacy – A New Season


Remembering A King

On April 4, 1968, civil rights leader Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., was shot to death in Memphis, Tenn. He was 39 years old. Traveling through time remembering his legacy and our past has made me realize where we’ve come from and how far we have to go. Dr. King’s Dream of unity within our society has yet to be fully accomplished. We shall overcome!!!

“Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.” “I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality… I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word.”

“Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will. And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I’ve looked over. And I’ve seen the promised land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people will get to the promised land.”

“My husband was a man who hoped to be a Baptist preacher to a large, Southern, urban congregation. Instead, by the time he died in 1968, he had led millions of people into shattering forever the Southern system of segregation of the races.” ~ Coretta Scott King (1927-2006)

“Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. And so we must straighten our backs and work for our freedom. A man can’t ride you unless your back is bent.”

“Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed.”

“Human progress is neither automatic nor inevitable… Every step toward the goal of justice requires sacrifice, suffering, and struggle; the tireless exertions and passionate concern of dedicated individuals.”

“I submit that an individual who breaks the law that conscience tells him is unjust and willingly accepts the penalty by staying in jail to arouse the conscience of the community over its injustice, is in reality expressing the very highest respect for law.”

“It may be true that the law cannot make a man love me, but it can keep him from lynching me, and I think that’s pretty important.”

“He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it.”

“I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”

“From every mountainside, let freedom ring. When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, ‘Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”

“The first question which the priest and the Levite asked was: “If I stop to help this man, what will happen to me?” But… the good Samaritan reversed the question: “If I do not stop to help this man, what will happen to him?”

“Nonviolence means avoiding not only external physical violence but also internal violence of spirit. You not only refuse to shoot a man, but you refuse to hate him.”

“I submit to you that if a man hasn’t discovered something that he will die for, he isn’t fit to live.”

“That old law about ‘an eye for an eye’ leaves everybody blind. The time is always right to do the right thing.”

“If physical death is the price that I must pay to free my white brothers and sisters from a permanent death of the spirit, then nothing can be more redemptive.”


Nightmare on MLK

th (1)

We hear a lot of talk about this street or that street; namely Wall Street and Main Street but who’s talking about MLK Street. When they talk about Wall Street, they are usually talking about the 1% or more aptly put the “Robber Barons”.

Main Street is supposed to be where the rest of us reside surviving on the crumbs or what little we can scrape to survive. I suppose its reasonable to place everyone in these two camps, but not so much because MLK Street is never added to the conversation.

There was a term or distinction devised calling neighborhoods where MLK Streets are located – the “Ghetto”. As cool and hip as it sounds it is not a positive description of the communities where people of color reside. I should say that the distinction has been upgraded to what many have embraced – “the Hood”. As it is by design, it carries the usually, although sounding cool, negative connotation of the black community and MLK Street is always in the “Hood”.

In this place depicted as crime riddled and drug infested with gangsta’s residing over the lives of the disenfranchised and the hopeless. There are no jobs or in many cases no way to survive – it breeds despair. I think we all know that this is cleaver social engineering at work and a misconception by design! Not a single soul living in the “Hood” has the means to bring in the drug or weapons into the community.

Moreover, when the people of these neighborhoods are deprived of educational opportunities as a result of being segregated – hopelessness is the by product. Let me suggest that if you are ever in the Nation’s Capital, ride by the Capital Building and you will notice that just a few blocks away you will find neighborhoods where just such a place exists – The Hood!

I firmly believe education is the single most important ingredient necessary to neutralize those forces that breed poverty and despair. This nation is the richest nation on this little rock called earth. So my plea is that instead of investments in war and helping the rich. Invest in “US” which means end the nightmare on MLK!

Dr. Carter G. Woodson challenged his readers in the epic novel “The Mis-Education of the Negro” to become empowered by doing for themselves. He said, regardless of what they were taught “History shows that it does not matter who is in power… those who have not learned to do for themselves and have to depend solely on others never obtain any more rights or privileges in the end than they did in the beginning.”

Nowhere in America will you find a street named after the dreamer in a neighborhood other where people of color live. So the next time you turn on MLK Street make no mistake you’re in a place called the “Hood” and what is a hood: something you hide. And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…

 


Black History Month: Featured Author Adra Young

22I wanted to select a very special person to spotlight this month to be someone deserving of special recognition. I know many great authors in the literary world, but I wanted to choose an author who possessed a very special gift, actually something bigger than His/Herself. The author I chose possesses just that; specifically because of her dedication and commitment to our youth and the young people of the community she serves. This includes her work in her chosen career as an educator to live her purpose, where she is driven to be of service and an example to children.

Adra Young is a native of Gary, Indiana and is not your typical educator. Having a desire to act, she took her first shot within the performance arena at Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio. After relocating to Detroit to pursue her teaching career, she wasted no time taking additional acting classes to perfect the craft. Performance readiness led Young to receiving roles in various commercials and played within the south-east region of Michigan.

In 2005, Young wrote and published her first book titled, The Everyday Living of Children & Teens Monologues. The following year, she launched and established “Ardannyl”, which is an after school program designed to promote acting, singing, dancing, creative writing, and art. Her second book, The Everyday Living of Children & Teens Monologues released in 2008.

As she continued on her journey, in 2009, Young along with her literary partner, Tracie Christian initiated a joint venture titled, “The Live Ladies of Literature” artistic movement. The creation of this collaboration resulted in free bi-monthly forums titled, Coffee Arts & Entertainment, a poetry venue, and three captivating monologue shows. Coffee Arts & Entertainment provided artist residing within the south-east region of Michigan one chance of mass public exposure, which all three monologue shows were successfully debuting.

May of 2010, Young teamed-up with the founder of the Detroit Impact Center, Mr. Colbert, where she assumed the role of the Detroit Impact Center socialization skills curriculum provider for the youth ranging from ages twelve and up. In May of 2013, her third book, The Misfits was released in an e-book version. She currently blogs about educational concerns that pertain to the youth and is responsible for conducting over 100 book reviews for both traditional and self -published authors.

It is a great honor for me to recognize Adra Young as The Thought Provoking Perspectives Black History Month’s Featured Author because her spirit is embedded with a simple concept, knowingly or not, that she may not change the world, but she can change the mind of the person who will. Congratulations!!! And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

Kindly, visit Adra Young’s website to see and purchase her novels. HERE


Black History: Brown V Board of Education

It’s been nearly sixty years since the landmark Brown v Board of Education case successfully argued before Supreme Court of the United States. This case changed the face of America in away unlike any other decision heard by this body.

The Brown Case, as it is known, was not the first such case regarding civil rights argued before the court. However, it was the most significant of what some would say was the final battle in the courts that had been fought by African American parents since 1849, which started with Roberts v. City of Boston, Massachusetts.

It is important to note that Kansas was the site of eleven such cases spanning from 1881 to 1949. With that said, I would like to take the opportunity to pay homage to the valor of a skillful attorney, Thurgood Marshall, who brilliantly won this case and more than fifty other cases before the Supreme Court – winning all of them.

The Brown case was initiated and organized by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) leadership who recruited African American parents in Topeka, Kansas for a class action suit against the local school board. The Supreme Court combined five cases under the heading of Brown v. Board of Education: Delaware, Kansas, South Carolina, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. The ultimate goal sought by the NAACP was to end the practice of “separate but equal” throughout every segment of society, including public transportation, dining facilities, public schools and all forms of public accommodations. The Case was named after Oliver Brown one of 200 plaintiffs.

The Brown Supreme Court ruling determined racial segregation in public education was unconstitutional in Brown I, the first opinion. The court’s implementation mandate of “with all deliberate speed” in 1955, known as Brown II. In 1979, twenty five years later, there was a Brown III because Topeka was not living up to the earlier Supreme Court ruling, which resulted in Topeka Public Schools building three magnet schools to comply with the court’s findings.

As had been the case since Homer Plessy, the subject in Plessy v. Ferguson in 1896, when the U.S. Supreme Court decided that a Louisiana law mandating separate but equal accommodations for blacks and whites on intrastate railroads was constitutional. This decision provided the legal foundation to justify many other actions by state and local governments to socially separate blacks and whites.

Now that I have provided some history related to the case let me add my commentary. It has been said, “As sure as things change they remain the same”. First, it took 60 year to overturn Plessy with Brown and it took “with all deliberate speed” 13 years for integration to begin fully. During this period from 1954 to 1967, Governors blocked school entrances and actually closed schools rather than comply with the law of the land. I am not going to touch on the violence that caused President’s to send the US Army and National Guard troops to schools in order to protect the safety of those the ruling was intended benefit as a result of the Brown decision.

Since then and over time many scams have been devised to disenfranchise minorities and African Americans in particular – need I remind you of “No Child Left Behind”. This brings us to where we are today. Schools are equally as segregated, poorly funded, dilapidated facilities, and a police presence to save, often times, the kids from themselves. The dropout rate averages 2 to 1. These are just a few issues and by any measure of academic standards or common sense – is a failure.

Let’s make sure we understand that public education was not created to develop minds, rather it was intended to simply teach reading, writing, and arithmetic. It was created to maintain a permanent underclass. Maybe the word “class” is the operative word in all of this – the haves have and the have not’s will have not. So as sure as things change they remain the same.

That is why it is imperative for us to celebrate this Black History Month and continue the struggle for equality, as the ghosts of so many died for a simply principle; “education is the single most important ingredient necessary to neutralize those forces that breed poverty and despair”.

Black History is American History! And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…

“Just a Season”
 
Legacy – A New Season the sequel is coming!


Drama In The Church

th (4)I’ll start by saying “Here we go again”. We seem to continue to witness the fall of people held in high regard with titles like, and for the purpose of this post, use the word pastor loosely. You know those Mega-Church Pastor’s who adorn the grace of the pulpit who has fallen short of the long arm of the law, at least morally. Let’s see there has been the flashy televangelist Eddie Wrong and Creflo “The Dollar Man” known for preaching that prosperity is good.

Now we have Pastor, and I use this loosely also, Jamal Bryant’s fall from grace that began with an extramarital affair that tore up his congregation and destroyed his marriage. This guy was the leader of a mega church, the Empowerment Temple in Baltimore, Maryland, whose affair ended his marriage, disrupted his congregation, and almost destroyed his ministry. It is alleged that he had a child by a member of the congregation as a preacher.

Although this is not as bad as the Bishop, and I use that loosely, Eddie Long’s situation – somehow in my mind it begs the question – WTF? First of all, if Jesus where to come back today I am pretty sure he would do just as he did in the temple with the money changes. In my opinion, these leaders of huge flocks cannot effectively serve the community when they have the huge financial responsibility of such monstrosities. Frankly, it’s just business! Just sayin!

There is a very popular radio host who does a show from time to time called “Pimps in the Pulpit”. Let me be clear, I am not calling either of these Sheppard’s pimps but when you take from the needy to benefit the greedy. Well, we have to find a word that more accurately describes the mission other than pastor. The larger question is who are the followers of these guys? Are they just sheep lead blindly?

Let’s recap! Last year there was a Mega-Church preacher from Florida who was found dead in New York (allegedly) of a drug overdose with drugs found on his person (allegedly). Both Long and Dollar were among six televangelists investigated by Iowa U.S. Senator Chuck Grassley from 2007 to 2010, following questions about personal use of church-owned airplanes, luxury homes and credit cards by mega church pastors and their families. I won’t even touch the Catholic Church and their problems.

I don’t believe these are isolated instances and I am not saying that every church falls into this kind of negative category. But I would suggest that if there tax status changed some of these issues would be remedied. I also want to say I am not just picking on African American pastors. There are just as many whites and others who are just as foul in their devotion to the all mighty dollar and enjoy the sins of the flesh. Like the Catholic Priests!

I am not going to spend too many words on the frailties of faith leaders. Nor am I challenging anyone’s faith – but believers we are or should be believers in the word of God and the teachings of Jesus! Not some jokers with private jets or a huge worship palaces that you are paying for. If I can use a popular phrase that says “Game Knows Game” or you should.

Lastly, it might be a good idea to not be so blindly devoted to hustlers, con artist, or maybe I should say, pimps in the pulpit and you know who they are. Let me close by suggesting that maybe it is time to believe in yourself and know that you might find power in your soul. So, let’s get back to family, which is your strength! And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…

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