Tag Archives: african american journey

The Aftermath Of Integration

1I recently had a conversation with a group of young people, none of which lived during the age of government segregation. Each had strongly convoluted opinions about the era that were not based in fact. This made me think about how much the current world view has changed the reality of black life, as it relates to a historical perspective.

First, white folk never wanted it and chatted go back to Africa at the time. It was never intended to be fair or equal! I am not suggesting that integration should not have happened, but it did have a negative impact on black life and the future of African Americans in many ways. Two prominent ways were in the areas of family and black business.

One thing that happened, for sure was that the black community stopped supporting the businesses in their own communities. After segregation, African Americans flocked to support businesses owned by whites and other groups, causing black restaurants, theaters, insurance companies, banks, etc. to almost disappear. Today, black people spend 95 percent of their income at white-owned businesses. Even though the number of black firms has grown 60.5 percent between 2002 and 2007, they only make up 7 percent of all U.S firms and less than .005 percent of all U.S business receipts.

I took the opportunity to educate these young people that in 1865, just after Emancipation, 476,748 free blacks – 1.5 percent of U.S. population– owned .005 percent of the total wealth of the United States. Today, a full 135 years after the abolition of slavery, 44.5 million African Americans – 14.2 percent of the population — possess a meager 1 percent of the national wealth.

If we look at relationships from 1890 to 1950, black women married at higher rates than white women, despite a consistent shortage of black males due to their higher mortality rate. According to a report released by the Washington DC-based think tank the Urban Institute, the state of the African American family is worse today than it was in the 1960s, four years before President Johnson passed the Civil Rights Act.

In 1965, only 8 percent of childbirths in the black community occurred out of wedlock. In 2010, out-of-wedlock childbirths in the black community are at an astonishing 72 percent. Researchers Heather Ross and Isabel Sawhill argue that the marital stability is directly related to the husband’s relative socio-economic standing and the size of the earnings difference between men and women.

Instead of focusing on maintaining black male employment to allow them to provide for their families, Johnson passed the Civil Rights Act with full affirmative action for women. The act benefited mostly white women and created a welfare system that encouraged the removal of the black male from the home. Many black men were also dislodged from their families and pushed into the rapidly expanding prison industrial complex that developed in the wake of rising unemployment.

Since integration, the unemployment rate of black men has been spiraling out of control. In 1954, white men had a zero percent unemployment rate, while African-American men experienced a 4 percent rate. By 2010, it was at 16.7 percent for Black men compared to 7.7 percent for white men. The workforce in 1954 was 79 percent African American. By 2011, that number had decreased to 57 percent. The number of employed black women, however, has increased. In 1954, 43 percent of African American women had jobs. By 2011, 54 percent of black women are job holders.

The Civil Rights Movement pushed for laws that would create a colorblind society, where people would not be restricted from access to education, jobs, voting, travel, public accommodations, or housing because of race. However, the legislation did nothing to eradicate white privilege. Michael K. Brown, professor of politics at University of California Santa Cruz, and co-author of“Whitewashing Race: The Myth of a Color-Blind Society” says in the U.S., “The color of one’s skin still determines success or failure, poverty or affluence, illness or health, prison or college.”

Two percent of all working African Americans work for another African American’s within their own neighborhood. Because of this, professionally trained Black people provide very little economic benefit to the black community. Whereas, prior to integration that number was significantly higher because of segregation people in the black community supported each other to sustain their lives and families.

The Black median household income is about 64 percent that of whites, while the Black median wealth is about 16 percent that of whites. Millions of Black children are being miseducated by people who don’t care about them, and they are unable to compete academically with their peers. At the same time, the criminal justice system has declared war on young Black men with policies such as “stop and frisk” and “three strikes.”

Marcus Garvey warned about this saying:

“Lagging behind in the van of civilization will not prove our higher abilities. Being subservient to the will and caprice of progressive races will not prove anything superior in us. Being satisfied to drink of the dregs from the cup of human progress will not demonstrate our fitness as a people to exist alongside of others, but when of our own initiative we strike out to build industries, governments, and ultimately empires, then and only then will we as a race prove to our Creator and to man in general that we are fit to survive and capable of shaping our own destiny.”

Maybe this proves that once past truths are forgotten, and the myths that are lies are born with an unfounded reality detrimental to all, but those who seek to benefit. As I have often said, “I firmly believe education is the single most important ingredient necessary to neutralize those forces that breed poverty and despair. We can change the world but first, we must change ourselves.” And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

Twitter @JohnTWills

Source: Black Atlanta Star


The Middle Passage

16266194_1576646812351280_7451924563813283492_nWe cannot talk about Black History without remembering that horrible journey across the Atlantic called the Middle Passage. Imagine if you can, being captured, put on a forced march, beaten, put into pins while shackled, and then placed in a tomb-like environment with people you cannot, in many cases, communicate with for months, as you suffer a horrible journey into the abyss of the unknown. Now, look at what they call this today “The Trans-Atlantic Voyage,” as if it was a pleasure cruise Shocking!!!

These were the conditions leading to that horrible journey into the unknown for millions of Africans forcibly interned into the belly of the beast with a destination unknown. His-Story speaks to this wretched practice as part of the Atlantic slave trade. However, this was more commonly known as the “Middle Passage,” which refers to that middle leg of the transatlantic trade triangle in which millions of Africans were imprisoned, enslaved, and removed forcibly from their homelands never to return.

The transatlantic trade triangle worked this way. Ships departed Europe for African markets with commercial goods, which were in turn traded for kidnapped Africans who were transported across the Atlantic as slaves. The enslaved Africans were then sold or traded as commodities for raw materials, which would be transported back to Europe to complete the “triangular trade”. A single voyage on the Middle Passage was a large financial undertaking that was generally organized by companies or groups of investors rather than individuals.

African kings, warlords, and private kidnappers sold captives to Europeans who operated from several coastal forts. The captives were usually force-marched to these ports along the western coast of Africa, where they were held for sale to the European or American slave traders. Typical slave ships contained several hundred slaves with about thirty crew members.

The male captives were chained together in pairs to save space with their right leg chained to the next man’s left leg, with women and children having somewhat more room. The captives were fed beans, corn, yams, rice, and palm oil. Slaves were fed one meal a day with water, but if food were scarce slaveholders would get priority over the slaves.

The duration of the transatlantic voyage varied widely, from one to six months depending on weather conditions. Although, the journey became more efficient over time as the average transatlantic journey of the early 16th century lasted several months, by the 19th century the crossing often required fewer than six weeks. West Central Africa and Southeastern Africa was the most common region for traders to secure the human cargo that was destined for the Caribbean and the Americas.

An estimated 15% of the Africans died at sea, with mortality rates considerably higher in Africa itself in the process of capturing and transporting indigenous peoples to the ships. The total number of African deaths directly attributable to the Middle Passage is estimated well into the millions. A broader look at African deaths directly attributable to the institution of slavery from 1500 to 1900 suggests up to four million perished, but some say the number was close to one-third of the Africans captured, and it is believed that nearly 60 million were captured.

For two hundred years, Portugal had a quasi-monopoly on the export of slaves from Africa. During the eighteenth century, however, when the slave trade accounted for the transport of about 6 million Africans; Britain was responsible for almost 2.5 million of them. In addition to markedly influencing the cultural and demographic landscapes of both Africa and the Americas, the Middle Passage has also been said to mark the origin of a distinct African social identity. These people, in American anyway, came to be known as “Negro,” which is a Spanish word that means “Black” but no Spanish country refers to its people of color that way.

Most contemporary historians estimate that between 9 and 12 million Africans arrived in the New World while others remain firm that it was more like one-third of the continent’s population. Disease and starvation due to the length of the passage were the main contributors to the death toll with dysentery and scurvy causing most of the deaths. Then there were the outbreaks of smallpox, syphilis, measles, and other diseases spread rapidly in the close-quarter compartments.

The number of dead increased with the length of the voyage since the incidence of dysentery and scurvy increased with longer stints at sea as the quality and amount of food and water diminished with every passing day. In addition to physical sickness, many slaves became too depressed to eat or function efficiently because of the loss of freedom, family, security, and their own humanity.

While treatment of slaves on the passage varied, the treatment of the human cargo was never good since the captured African men and women were considered less than human. Yes, they were “cargo” or “goods” and treated as such as they were transported for marketing.

Slaves were ill-treated in almost every imaginable manner. While they were generally fed enough food and water to stay alive only because healthy slaves were more valuable but if resources ran low on the long, unpredictable voyages, the crew received preferential treatment. Slave punishment was very common and harsh because the crew had to turn independent people into obedient slaves. Whipping and use of the cat o’ nine tails were common occurrences or just simply beaten for “melancholy.”

The scares of this and that of slavery linger to this very day. I would call the loss of land, soul, and our history as Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome. And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…

Media Kit


Sunday Morning Truth

This is the perfect message for a Sunday morning lesson full of truth from the Master Teach Dr. John Henrik Clarke. Listen and learn!


America’s Shocking and Ugly Truth

 A picture is worth a thousand words.

2

Enough said, and that’s my thought provoking perspective…


Listen To Minster Malcolm Speak


Brother Dick Gregory Speaks

2Today, I wanted to do something a little different and share a message from our elder statesman Dick Gregory. You don’t have to watch it but I would strongly suggest that you listen. Truth, in many respects, have always come from comedy. Brother Dick’s comedy educates and empowers but you have to listen this thought provoking perspective…

 


A Life’s Journey

1This thing we call life is nothing more than a season characterized by a particular circumstance, suitable to an indefinite period of time associated with a divine phenomenon gifted to us by someone greater than ourselves. During this passage through time I have come to realize that there are milestones, mountains, and valleys that everyone will encounter.

This has caused me to realize what I view as a grace-filled journey was it a true story, a miracle, a blessing or just simply a fairy tale. While examining the evolution of my life to this point, through God’s grace, I was blessed with the good fortune or privilege to have had many precious moments.

What I have learned is that we need to appreciate and value those dear to us for tomorrow is not promised. This is why I think showing love is the toll we pay along the way. I will admit that my life has not been unlike that of any other man who has ever lived. Although challenging at times, the answer to those challenges was to have the will to survive, and that means being accountable for life on life’s terms, and of course understanding that I have no control over life’s terms.

Some may say that I am a self-made man, while I say I simply experienced a journey that was charted by someone greater than myself. I have been given the magnificent gift of being a benevolent spirit and the good fortune to have been blessed many times over, for which I am very grateful. I am thankful to have enjoyed the by-products of life, meaning the material things that can be gained from it. However, the most rewarding experiences have come from the personal enrichment gained from helping others.

I can recall my Granddaddy telling me to reach for the stars and understand that it is not a disgrace to do so. It is, however, a disgrace not to have a star. I worked hard trying to make my dreams come true. If my mind could conceive it and my heart would believe it, there was no reason not to achieve it. I was born and therefore I am.” In reality, it doesn’t matter what you have done for yourself. It is what you have done for humanity during the journey that is the more important question. Granddaddy taught me that doing the common things in life in an uncommon manner would command the attention of the world. It is possible that’s what my dear friend meant.

As I look back, I am honored to have given something to everyone whose path I’ve crossed, along with finding a place in my heart to care for other souls, especially those I loved. I cannot say that my greatest glory was never failing; although the objective was not to fail but when I did, finding the strength to rise when I have failed was the true blessing.

I learned a valuable lesson a long time ago, when I attended a Sunday school class, which was why Jesus wept. As the story goes, when Lazarus died, Jesus saw Mary and Martha weeping. He was so moved as he witnessed their pain for the loss of his friend that he also wept. Today I understand because I have felt that pain because I lost a son. So I understand that the real tragedy of life is not that it ends too soon. Perhaps the tragedy is that most people never have a chance to live life while they have it.

I sometimes wonder if the lessons from my experiences should be called obstacles or stepping-stones that shape the time I’ve have lived. Nonetheless, in their entirety – life’s lessons are priceless. Maybe this proves that God is in the miracles business. He works in mysterious ways with his wonders yet to behold.

Time is life and just as in life, time is something experienced that dictates the rhythm of your soul. As life’s most precious commodity, it waits for no one. All of us have been given only 24 hours each day, which is life’s great equalizer. It does not matter who you are – everyone is equal and from that standpoint, 1440 minutes each day are all you get. It is each minute that is the starting point for living the rest of your life or the last minute of it. Therefore, I must be ever so conscious of every single minute because each minute must be cherished and used ever so wisely. The key, however, is not how much time you have, rather what you do with that time. Since we know not the minute or the hour, my mission now must be to live each eternal moment.

How interesting it is that we come into this world crying while all around us are smiling. Then we leave the world smiling while everybody around us weeps. This brings to mind a sermon my childhood pastor, Reverend Cole, gave explaining this phenomenon called life in the simplest of terms. He said, “This period of existence we call life in the final analysis is Just a Season.” And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

 


%d bloggers like this: