Tag Archives: black women

A Queen In Name Only

1zIt is a fact that the black woman is the foundation of the African American Diaspora. There is no doubt the black woman is the greatest gift given to the world. She is the most powerful force ever created and the mother of life. Therefore, it is an honor to say she is our foundation, but our rock is crumbling and that means so is our salvation; causing much despair and possibly our extinction.

In the last thirty – forty years or so, something happened. We seemed to have forsaken the struggles that bound all black people to join the causes of everyone else who claims to have an issue. It’s called divide and conquer!

If you follow Thought Provoking Perspectives, you know I don’t shy away from controversy, rather offer hard truths or at least give you something to think about. Sometimes these truths are disturbing, as is this documentary, but more often than not; I hope my words produce thought and hopefully leading to solutions. If nothing else it may cause you to view thing from a different perspective.

One of my followers sent me this documentary that is the first in the groundbreaking series that lay out in INTELLIGENT terms, according to the producer, why Black America is in dire straights. It speaks to issues, such as; where the black woman went wrong. Whether you agree with what’s said in the video or not; the African American Diaspora is in trouble. So the question is; what can be done to bring about unity?

Let’s talk about it!

What say you!


A Message For The Black Woman

Image1.I want to say from the outset that this message is not intended to discredit black women because I LOVE black women – my mother, sister, grandma, aunts, and most of the women in my family are black women. God gave you to the world for a divine and important purpose, which is why you are the original mother and the first woman.

These words are intended as an observation of my experiences with black women and what white supremacy has done to corrupt their thinking. First, the system of supremacy has corrupted your thinking – in other words, brainwashed many of you. I say this because you, most, believe and love their white Jesus more than you love your man!

The God you worship so vehemently created the black man for you. He is the strongest man in the universe and also divine. You are the foundation of the family, which means to support him, bare and raise his children; which is the sole reason we were created to continue the species.

There are too many black women who have adopted the white woman’s liberation movement, and the concept of feminism, which is toxic to successful black families and life. Those issues are not the black woman’s issues. Your issues are the same as that of the black man, which is to be united and fight the forces and the system of oppression imposed upon you and I as black people.

I decided to write this post because there are clear representations of your views in survey after survey. Rich or poor, educated or not, black women sometimes feel as though the imposed myths are stalking them like shadows, their lives are reduced to a string of labels. Such as the angry black woman; the strong black woman; the unfeeling black woman; and true or not the manless black woman. Sophia Nelson Author of “Black Woman Redefined” was quoted in the article saying “Black women haven’t really defined themselves.”

Frankly, you are defined by your actions and white people. I know you think white people and his white Jesus loves you – they don’t. In fact, most black women love Jesus so much that they out Pope the Pope. The Jesus they have you worshiping, if he lived at all, was a black man. Yes, he looks like your man – the black who white folk taught you to hate. Now I know you did not hear this in the church today. Frankly, the church only wants your money, and the “pimp in the pulpit” did nothing for you today other than make you feel good for an hour. Then return to doing the same thing you were doing all week.

There was a nationwide survey conducted by The Washington Post and the Kaiser Family Foundation some time ago. From it emerged a complex portrait of black women who feel confident but vulnerable, who have high self-esteem and see physical beauty as most important, and who find career success more vital to them than marriage. The survey represents the most extensive exploration of the lives and views of black women in decades.

Of course, they hit on the usual topics such as Religion being essential to most black women’s lives adding that being in a romantic relationship is not all that important. The survey showed nearly three-quarters of black women say now is a good time to be a black woman in America, and yet a similar proportion worry about having enough money to pay their bills. Half of black women surveyed call racism a “big problem” in the country; nearly half worry about being discriminated against. Eighty-five percent say they are satisfied with their own lives, but one-fifth say they are often treated with less respect than other people.

According to the stereotype, “black women even educated women are b—— and wh—-, and they run men out of their lives because they are so mean, and they don’t want a man and blah, blah,” says Palmer an Atlanta lawyer who helped lead protests of rapper Nelly’s controversial “Tip Drill” video when she was a student at Spelman College. “My law firm has no African American female partners. It has to do with how we are seen. And our value is based on what the media shows the world we are.”

Black women were once described as the “mules of the world” by Zora Neale Hurston, whose biting literature made her one of the most influential black writers of the early 20th century. Her reference to mules — the workhorses of the American South — pointed to the backbreaking manual labor that black women were expected to perform, and the limits placed on their vocations. Throughout history, black women have been over-represented in the workforce compared with other women and have come to embrace work as an enduring part of their sense of self, says Constance C.R. White.

It is a fact that the black woman is the mother of all mankind. Having said that black women know there is an institutional system in place that is designed to lower your standard and perception. This is as old as the nation or dare I say the world, which is needed to maintain this misguided principle.

It’s time to change the narrative, unless and until you put family first we cannot and will never build a nation or make any positive move forward toward freedom for your children. So, I say hold your head up, keep looking up, and don’t allow others to define you. Many will have you think differently but know that we love you, your community needs and appreciates you. And that’s my Thought provoking perspective…

The Apology

BUY YOUR COPY TODAY “Just a Season


A Thought For The Ladies

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Quotes From Legendary Black Women Writers

th (37)Very soon we will commemorate another 28 days of Black History. What this means we’ll celebrate the ghost of the greats and the positive achievement accomplished in their lives. Oftentimes, most only talk about a few, as if black people only made limited contributions to America, the world, or the process of human live. When in fact, nearly everything there is came from the original people of the earth, and if it were not for the black woman none of this would be possible. We hardly ever hear about or are taught anything anything black women said or did during the course of human history.

Today’s Thought Provoking Perspective will feature powerful quotes by and spoken by black women taken from an collection by Jessica Ann Mitchell the founder of OurLegaci.com & BlackBloggersConnect.com.

Here are some quotes from legendary Black women writers that can be used as continual tools for learning, growth, confidence and fearlessness.

  1. “It’s no use of talking unless people understand what you say.” -Zora Neale Hurston
  2. “No black woman writer in this culture can write “too much.” Indeed, no woman writer can write ‘too much’…No woman has ever written enough.” – bell hooks
  3. “I’m a firm believer that language and how we use language determines how we act, and how we act then determines our lives and other people’s lives.” -Ntozake Shange
  4. “When I dare to be powerful, to use my strength in the service of my vision, then it becomes less and less important whether I am afraid.” – Audre Lorde
  5. “We write for the same reason that we walk, talk, climb mountains or swim the oceans – because we can. We have some impulse within us that makes us want to explain ourselves to other human beings.” – Maya Angelou
  6. “I think writing really helps you heal yourself. I think if you write long enough, you will be a healthy person. That is, if you write what you need to write, as opposed to what will make money, or what will make fame.” -Alice Walker
  7. “If there’s a book you really want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.” -Toni Morrison
  8.  “The ability of writers to imagine what is not the self, to familiarize the strange and mystify the familiar, is the test of their power.” -Toni Morrison
  9. “Many stories matter. Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign. But stories can also be used to empower, and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people. But stories can also repair that broken dignity.” ― Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  10.  “Everything I’ve ever done, in the writing world, has been to expand articulation, rather than to close it.” – Toni Morrison
  11.  “Challenging power structures from the inside, working the cracks within the system, however, requires learning to speak multiple languages of power convincingly.” – Patricia Hill Collins
  12. “The single story creates stereotypes, and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story.” ― Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  13. “Writing can be a lifeline, especially when your existence has been denied, especially when you have been left on the margins, especially when your life and process of growth have been subjected to attempts at strangulation.” ― Micere Githae Mugo
  14. “Sure you can do anything when talking or writing, it’s not like living when you can only do what you doing.” ― Sapphire
  15. “A writer should get as much education as possible, but just going to school is not enough; if it were, all owners of doctorates would be inspired writers.” – Gwendolyn Brooks
  16. “First forget inspiration. Habit is more dependable. Habit will sustain you whether you’re inspired or not. Habit will help you finish and polish your stories. Inspiration won’t. Habit is persistence in practice.” ― Octavia E. Butler
  17. “I write for young girls of color, for girls who don’t even exist yet, so that there is something there for them when they arrive. I can only change how they live, not how they think.” -Ntozake Shange
  18. “Let woman’s claim be as broad in the concrete as the abstract. We take our stand on the solidarity of humanity, the oneness of life, and the unnaturalness and injustice of all special favoritism, whether of sex, race, country, or condition. If one link of the chain is broken, the chain is broken.” – Anna Julia Cooper
  19. “I don’t want to be limited or ghettoized in any way.” -Sista Soulja
  20. “Discomfort is always a necessary part of enlightenment.” ― Pearl Cleage
  21. “Words mean more than what is set down on paper. It takes the human voice to infuse them with deeper meaning.” -Maya Angelou
  22. “You don’t start out writing good stuff. You start out writing crap and thinking it’s good stuff, and then gradually you get better at it. That’s why I say one of the most valuable traits is persistence.” ― Octavia E. Butler
  23. “Many times, what people call ‘writer’s block’ is the confusion that happens when a writer has a great idea, but their writing skill is not up to the task of putting that idea down on paper. I think that learning the craft of writing is critical.” -Pearl Cleage
  24. “Shakespeare wrote about love. I write about love. Shakespeare wrote about gang warfare, family feuds and revenge. I write about all the same things.” -Sister Souljah
  25. “Putting words on paper regularly is part of the necessary discipline of writing.” -Pearl Cleage
  26. “Poetry is the lifeblood of rebellion, revolution, and the raising of consciousness.” -Alice Walker
  27. “You must be unintimidated by your own thoughts because if you write with someone looking over you shoulder, you’ll never write.” ― Nikki Giovanni
  28. “Writers don’t write from experience, although many are hesitant to admit that they don’t. …If you wrote from experience, you’d get maybe one book, maybe three poems. Writers write from empathy.” ― Nikki Giovanni
  29. “There is always something left to love. And if you ain’t learned that, you ain’t learned nothing.” -Lorraine Hansberry
  30. “People who want to write either do it or they don’t. At last I began to say that my most important talent – or habit – was persistence. Without it, I would have given up writing long before I finished my first novel. It’s amazing what we can do if we simply refuse to give up.” ― Octavia E. Butler
  31. “People wish to be poets more than they wish to write poetry, and that’s a mistake. One should wish to celebrate more than one wishes to be celebrated.” –Lucille Clifton
  32. “Poetry is a political act because it involves telling the truth.” ― June Jordan
  33. “We have to talk about liberating minds as well as liberating society.” -Angela Davis

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Black Women And Faith

black woman faithI likes to think I have faith, at least a little and, therefore, I would say more spiritual than religious because I understand that religion is a business and being spiritual is of the soul. With that said, most black women have fallen prey to this notion of church over religion. There has been any number of articles suggesting, with statistics, that African American women are the most fervently religious people on earth. Now, having known a few black women in my time this was not that much of a surprise because I have found that most will out Pope the Pope!

There was a woman quoted in one such survey as saying: “Finding that verse at that moment was no coincidence… God had spoken. Instantly, a sense of calm and confidence enveloped her. In times like these, when she feels anxious, afraid or unsure… relies on her faith.” Just so you know faith is that what you believe to be true that cannot be seen. Keep reading I have some thoughts on this too! But first let me talk about the survey.

A Washington Post and Kaiser Family Foundation nationwide survey some time ago found that nine in 10 African American women revealed that as a group, black women are among the most religious people in the nation. The survey found that 74 percent of black women said that “living a religious life” is very important. On that same question, the number falls to 57 percent of white women and 43 percent of white men. The women of the other hue believe more “in God we trust.” Money!

I understand that during times of turmoil, which black people have, living in America. Black women endure much more than any other group causing them to turn to their faith to get through. Black women, across education and income levels, say living a religious life is a greater priority than being married or having children, and this call to faith either surpasses or pulls even with having a career as a life goal, the survey shows.

Stacey Floyd-Thomas, an associate professor of ethics and society at Vanderbilt University Divinity School says, “Black women have been the most mistreated and scandalized group in U.S. society and culture as they wrestle both individually and collectively with the triple jeopardy of racism, sexism, and classism.” To which I agree!

Looking back on her childhood, Hutchinson wonders: “Why would children be compelled to profess belief, especially when they look around them and see that the world is overpopulated with adult believers flaunting their immorality?” Hutchinson contends that perhaps there aren’t more black women grappling with that answer because there is little in their community that supports a different perspective.

The article went on to say “for most African American women, absolute trust in a higher power has been a truism for centuries.” The women said their focus is on one thing: their personal relationship with God.” Even more important than relationships, money, and family to which I find shocking. God created man for you, to give you children, which is family. I cannot believe it is his will to forsake that which he has provided for you.

LAW AND ORDER THEME!!!

Ok, here is where I am sure to upset some. First, we were brought to America as slaves, and there were two choices; take the Bible or die – by way of the rope or gun. Let me remind you there was no word G-O-D in any African language before the coming of Europeans. Also, the first registered slave ship was named the “Good Ship Jesus”. The WORD, supposedly given by God, that most so fervently believe was rewritten twenty-eight times with the last revision ordered by the diabolical King James of England, who stood to benefit from his rendition. My point here is that maybe we should not take the WORD literally.

I want to make two more points; the image of the deity that hangs on most church walls is that of a blonde haired blue eyed European, who could not possibly have come from that region of the world. The other point is this: there is a church in most communities on every corner, so I say if that was the answer why isn’t it working.

“I believe in something greater than myself, and I chose to call that God”. This in the practical sense should be adapted to mean “Good Orderly Direction”. I would respectfully suggest that we, and black women in particular, look to what is within to find strength because there you will find heaven. Lastly, it might be a good idea to not be so devoted and blindly follow con artist, or maybe I should say, pimps in the pulpit and you know who they are. In fact, we saw a good example of this when Trump gathered one-hundred of them recently.

Let me close by asking, “how can you love God, who you cannot see. Yet, you fail to love yourself or your man, who you can see. Let’s get back to the family, which is the strength needed to not only continue the species but to survived in the earthly realm! And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…

http://johntwills.com


An Open Letter of Apology To Black Men

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This video was sent to me by a follower, and it spoke volumes. I think everyone, both black men and especially black women, should view this message contained in this video and reflect. We must come together and stand together, if for no other reason than the furtherance of our future and ultimate survival.

It is very possible that those black women who think of themselves as independent and use the misguided claim of being a strong black women; you are weak and in essence committing “treason” or, as the Sista explains, your power is displaced. And that is my thought provoking perspective…


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