Tag Archives: disenfranchised

The Aftermath Of Integration

1I recently had a conversation with a group of young people, none of which lived during the age of government segregation. Each had strongly convoluted opinions about the era that were not based in fact. This made me think about how much the current world view has changed the reality of black life, as it relates to a historical perspective.

First, white folk never wanted it and chatted go back to Africa at the time. It was never intended to be fair or equal! I am not suggesting that integration should not have happened, but it did have a negative impact on black life and the future of African Americans in many ways. Two prominent ways were in the areas of family and black business.

One thing that happened, for sure was that the black community stopped supporting the businesses in their own communities. After segregation, African Americans flocked to support businesses owned by whites and other groups, causing black restaurants, theaters, insurance companies, banks, etc. to almost disappear. Today, black people spend 95 percent of their income at white-owned businesses. Even though the number of black firms has grown 60.5 percent between 2002 and 2007, they only make up 7 percent of all U.S firms and less than .005 percent of all U.S business receipts.

I took the opportunity to educate these young people that in 1865, just after Emancipation, 476,748 free blacks – 1.5 percent of U.S. population– owned .005 percent of the total wealth of the United States. Today, a full 135 years after the abolition of slavery, 44.5 million African Americans – 14.2 percent of the population — possess a meager 1 percent of the national wealth.

If we look at relationships from 1890 to 1950, black women married at higher rates than white women, despite a consistent shortage of black males due to their higher mortality rate. According to a report released by the Washington DC-based think tank the Urban Institute, the state of the African American family is worse today than it was in the 1960s, four years before President Johnson passed the Civil Rights Act.

In 1965, only 8 percent of childbirths in the black community occurred out of wedlock. In 2010, out-of-wedlock childbirths in the black community are at an astonishing 72 percent. Researchers Heather Ross and Isabel Sawhill argue that the marital stability is directly related to the husband’s relative socio-economic standing and the size of the earnings difference between men and women.

Instead of focusing on maintaining black male employment to allow them to provide for their families, Johnson passed the Civil Rights Act with full affirmative action for women. The act benefited mostly white women and created a welfare system that encouraged the removal of the black male from the home. Many black men were also dislodged from their families and pushed into the rapidly expanding prison industrial complex that developed in the wake of rising unemployment.

Since integration, the unemployment rate of black men has been spiraling out of control. In 1954, white men had a zero percent unemployment rate, while African-American men experienced a 4 percent rate. By 2010, it was at 16.7 percent for Black men compared to 7.7 percent for white men. The workforce in 1954 was 79 percent African American. By 2011, that number had decreased to 57 percent. The number of employed black women, however, has increased. In 1954, 43 percent of African American women had jobs. By 2011, 54 percent of black women are job holders.

The Civil Rights Movement pushed for laws that would create a colorblind society, where people would not be restricted from access to education, jobs, voting, travel, public accommodations, or housing because of race. However, the legislation did nothing to eradicate white privilege. Michael K. Brown, professor of politics at University of California Santa Cruz, and co-author of“Whitewashing Race: The Myth of a Color-Blind Society” says in the U.S., “The color of one’s skin still determines success or failure, poverty or affluence, illness or health, prison or college.”

Two percent of all working African Americans work for another African American’s within their own neighborhood. Because of this, professionally trained Black people provide very little economic benefit to the black community. Whereas, prior to integration that number was significantly higher because of segregation people in the black community supported each other to sustain their lives and families.

The Black median household income is about 64 percent that of whites, while the Black median wealth is about 16 percent that of whites. Millions of Black children are being miseducated by people who don’t care about them, and they are unable to compete academically with their peers. At the same time, the criminal justice system has declared war on young Black men with policies such as “stop and frisk” and “three strikes.”

Marcus Garvey warned about this saying:

“Lagging behind in the van of civilization will not prove our higher abilities. Being subservient to the will and caprice of progressive races will not prove anything superior in us. Being satisfied to drink of the dregs from the cup of human progress will not demonstrate our fitness as a people to exist alongside of others, but when of our own initiative we strike out to build industries, governments, and ultimately empires, then and only then will we as a race prove to our Creator and to man in general that we are fit to survive and capable of shaping our own destiny.”

Maybe this proves that once past truths are forgotten, and the myths that are lies are born with an unfounded reality detrimental to all, but those who seek to benefit. As I have often said, “I firmly believe education is the single most important ingredient necessary to neutralize those forces that breed poverty and despair. We can change the world but first, we must change ourselves.” And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

Twitter @JohnTWills

Source: Black Atlanta Star


Voting: The Illusion Of Inclusion

11Most honest people know that the biggest con America has pulled on its people was to “give a man the vote and make him think he’s free.” It should say a lot when a black man, former slaves, was given the right to vote, although rarely did they let them, before a woman! This was the so-called patriot’s wife, mother, sister, and daughter! But they claimed freedom for all.

For those who think that their vote counts, I will only remind you of the election of 2000 – Bush and Gore where Gore got the most popular votes. The reality is the president is selected by the rich and powerful not elected. As far as the person elected will do anything for black people, it is a myth. Black people know from history, regardless who the person that is elected they “we will get what they always got” – nothing! I love Obama and glad that I lived to see a black man as president, but the truth is it was merely optics. To be honest, he has done nothing for black people.

But as quickly as we celebrated this proud moment in history now it’s over, and we go back to a white face to lead the nation and we have seen what that is like – remember Bush? Now the choices are evil verses less evil. However, what election did was to show us what is in the hearts of most of white America, the Republicans, and the so-called Christian Conservatives. We saw they are merely the KKK in a suit.

“Let’s be clear, it is the Electoral College that elects a president, not your vote and for those who don’t know what the Electoral College is; it’s a body of people representing, elites, in each the states, who formally cast votes for the election of the president and vice president.”

Yes, granting blacks and women the right to vote was a good thing. Especially, without presented with some near insurmountable hurdles, literacy test, and voter intimidation, est. But all the while they continuing to try many attempts to snatch away the vote for many of its citizens, which we must resist the illusion, fight the power and make this place the slaves called “merica” fair and just but voting is just an illusion of inclusion a rich man’s con!!! And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


Slavery By Another Name

jailThe mass incarceration of black people is not a new phenomenon. It is as old as the nation itself. One could say that slavery was the precursor to taking away the rights of black people. What we see today is just and evolution of that through later added amendments to the constitution that codify it into law, and remember slavery was a law. The prison system is in many ways like slavery because it is a profit making endeavor on the backs of black people and has very little to do with justice. The fact is that there are more black people in prison than there were in slavery.

Everyone has an opinion on the prison system and incarceration. Some view it as the New Jim Crow and others see nothing wrong with the system at all. Regardless of your position, it makes one wonder about the fairness received by some, namely minorities and the poor, and whether it works for those unable to afford justice. America incarcerates, puts more people in jail than any other country on the planet. This alone tells you that it is a huge cash cow. Just as slavery was created and used to oppress Africans in the prison system is “Slavery”, just by another name.

It is reported in news accounts daily that people are released after spending years incarcerated for crimes they did not commit. Then, there is the sad irony of people being put to death that are innocent who fall into this shameful category. In addition to executing the mentally disabled and life sentences for minors are all a fact of American justice. Also, there is the fact that once released the convicts voting rights are taken away in most cases forever. It is just slavery by another name.

There is a long history of lynchings, chain gangs, and the free labor derived from this unholy system of injustice. It is worth noting the original concept of the police derived from slave catchers. It was not until recently that we witnessed the disproportionate sentencing for crimes such as cocaine vs. crack was clearly unfair! There is also the Stand Your Ground Laws and Stop, and such laws as Frisk that I would compare to the Fugitive Slave Laws championed by the government.

To be clear, it is not my position that law and order or punishment is not necessary. What is disparaging is that the justice system disproportionately affects the minority population of the citizenry. Did you know the clothing worn by our soldiers are made by the cheap labor of the incarcerated? What is more horrendous is that the police are out of control and have become an occupying force that is rewarded for feeding the beast that is the prison industrial complex!

Let me suggest that you read Michelle Alexander’s book “The New Jim Crow.” Finally, when you work for free, and someone else receives the profit; it is slavery regardless of the new name given to it. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


A Fearless Freedom Fighter

3I have been blessed to have met and known many people over the years; from the infamous to the famous; the great and not so great, and many honorable souls. I have been in the presence of a few presidents, shaken the hand of Nelson Mandela, met Muhammad Ali, famous Motown stars and many entertainers… on and on! However, none have impressed me more than this amazing woman I was allowed to call “Winnie” when I had the pleasure of meeting her.

The former wife of Nelson Mandela, Winnie Madikizela–Mandela, is a South African activist and politician; in addition to holding several other government positions. She’s been the head the African National Congress Women’s League and a member of the ANC’s National Executive Committee. I can’t count all the women I’ve known in my life, but I can honestly say that none rise to the level of this amazing woman, who has endured suffering far beyond that of any woman.

I am not trying to rewrite her story, rather give my impression of her from my encounters with the former Mrs. Mandela. Think about this for a moment; her husband was imprisoned for twenty-seven years, she was imprisoned, exiled, financial hardships, her home was bombed, endured attempts upon her life, and years of unthinkable horrors. What I find amazing is that she did this unselfishly for millions of South African’s she has never met. Most of the women I know would leave you for anyone of the above mentioned or as little as the common cold.

She was a controversial activist, yet popular among her supporters, and referred to as the ‘Mother of the Nation’. However, she was reviled by some South African’s while trying to help them achieve freedom. The ANC called her politically and morally accountable for the gross violations of human rights. We know from what our government did to Dr. King and Malcolm X, so personally; I am suspect of any of the public charges brought by the Apartheid government of South Africa.

She met the lawyer and anti-apartheid activist Nelson Mandela in 1957. They married in 1958 and had two daughters, Zenani (born 1959) and Zindzi (born 1960). Nelson Mandela was arrested in 1963 and released in 1990. The couple separated in 1992, and their divorce was finalized in 1996 with an unspecified out-of-court settlement.

I want to be clear when I say some will, I’m sure, take issue with my opinion concerning my view of her late husband, who as I understand it divorced her for political reasons. He could forgive his oppressors and jailers, yet could not forgive the woman who sacrificed so much and stood by him for all those years.

It is true that her reputation was damaged by such rhetoric as that displayed in a speech she gave in Munsieville on 13 April 1986. Where she endorsed the practice of necklacing (burning people alive using tires and petrol) by saying: “With our boxes of matches and our necklaces we shall liberate this country.” Further tarnishing her reputation were accusations by her bodyguard that she ordered a kidnapping and murder.

On 29 December 1988, a bodyguard, who was the coach of the Mandela United Football Club (MUFC), which acted as Mrs. Mandela’s personal security detail, abducted 14-year-old James Seipei (also known as Stompie Moeketsi) and three other youths; the four were beaten to get them to admit being informers. The body of one of them was found in a field with stab wounds to the throat. In 1991, she was convicted of kidnapping and being an accessory to assault in connection with the death of Seipei. Her six-year jail sentence was reduced to a fine on appeal.

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During South Africa’s transition to democracy, she adopted a far less conciliatory and compromising attitude than her husband toward the white community. Despite being on her husband’s arm when he was released in 1990, the first time the two had been seen in public for nearly thirty years and their thirty-eight year marriage ended two years later.

Ms. Mandela’s legal issues are in the public domain, and it’s your choice to Google if you like. What I will say from my perspective: “He who is without sin cast the first stone.” Lastly, I will say having the opportunity to be in her present was a life changing experience and will say proudly that I have yet to meet another woman who impressed me to such a profound degree. I know of no other woman who sacrificed so much for so many unselfishly. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


Reflections Of America’s Racial History

2The world in which we live is full of danger, which means there is much evil and many amoral people intent on the demise of black people. Let’s call it Genocide. We see this in the multitudes of unarmed black people killed at the hands of the law. When I journey back in time to recall history, I am reminded of a time when slave catchers roamed the nation, under cover of law, to hold people of color in bondage. Today, the same thing is happening undercover law by the police. Not to mention the 21st Century version of slavery – prisons and jails. I am sure you know that the Constitution gives license to do this in the latest amendment added after slavery.

Back in the day people of African descent were required to carry “freedom papers” to prove they did not belong to another so-called human being and slaves were required to have a pass to leave the plantation. When they did not have papers or could not produce them, the encounter often ended with an outcome that resulted in a brutal act or death by the “Good Christian folk” who owned that slave. This was vital to upholding a system of racial slavery through a body of laws that restricted and criminalized black mobility and autonomy. The fact of the matter – slavery never ended!

These laws resulting in blackness being synonymous with enslavement and the movement and activities of black people were severely curtailed. There was no right to bear arms that were banned for the purpose of control. This applies to felon today! This legal system relied upon all white colonists to police and survey black bodies. They were the eyes and ears of the law, and the courts gave them great latitude in assessing where black people could and could not be at any given time.

Over time, the criminal justice slave system became more sophisticated with the courts requiring blacks to carry documents that validated their rights to be in certain spaces and their ability to navigate their freedom to move. Enslaved people carried pieces of paper called slave passes, documents written by their owners, which indicated their destination, time of departure, arrival and return, and sometimes the purpose of their journey.

Even free people of African descent were required to carry “freedom papers” at all times to validate their free status and hence delineate the places where they could be. Any white person, regardless of their legal authority, could demand to see these documents and interrogate a black person at any time, without any justifiable cause. If the black person in question could not produce such documents, they could be arrested, beaten, maimed or murdered with impunity. Today, they call this “Stop and Frisk”!

Towns and communities hired groups of white men, everyday citizens, to “patrol” Southern space, which was a more formal arm of this system of surveillance. These vigilantes had the power to control and police black movement in any way they saw fit, with the sanction of law behind their actions, no matter how brutal they might be. Black people lived in constant fear of these men that evolved into the KKK. Today, they call it “Stand your Ground”!

People of this ilk during and after Reconstruction created “Black Codes” as they sought to maintain cheap, servile labor force throughout the South, they also criminalized black movement and were arrested for violating Black Codes.

After the arrest, they were fined, jailed, and often-times their labor was sold to white landowners who forced them to work as though they were slaves again. Over time, this kind of law and order morphed into its most extreme and horrific manifestation; the lynching of African Americans throughout the twentieth century.

The legacy of America’s racial past is similar today in many ways. This mindset is part of the reason black males are suspicious and criminal to many whites who assume they are “up to something”! Simply because they were moving through what they perceive as their space believing it is their right to do so. It’s called liberty today!

Case in point a wealthy white dentist shot and killed a lion and the world is in an uproar. There is a black person – man, women, child – killed just about one per week by the police and white America do not exhibit the same uproar. Like the lion, black people are becoming endangered species, which in reality is the goal – genocide!

History is known to repeat itself, or it just remains the same. Some say; we are witnessing a return to America’s wretched past – I say it never changed – we just have accepted it! The system is designed to protect the system, and this whole idea speaks to privilege. And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…


America’s Shocking and Ugly Truth

 A picture is worth a thousand words.

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Enough said, and that’s my thought provoking perspective…


The New Negro Woman Movement

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In the late 1890s until the early 1920s there was a powerful force in world consciousness called the New Negro Woman Movement. This was not just an American movement, but an International campaign that pushed for Black Women to be seen as dignified ladies with the utmost respect.

This operation was in existence during a time when many Black Women were looked upon as rag-tag mistresses or servants reflective of the chattel slavery era. These women were the predecessor to both the Black Nationalist and Pan-African Movements.

Furthermore, they were real black women who endured struggles that black women today cannot imagine. These were “strong black women” compared to many women of today’s generation, where most should be ashamed for not carrying on their proud legacy. And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…

This video is dedicated to the long forgotten New Negro Woman Movement.


Reach One Teach One

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I want to speak to those who saw Black History Month as trendy and have forgotten its significance. If this rings a bell, it is a month “they” call Black History Month but Black History should be lived “24/7/365”.

During the month of February, everyone is “blacker than black” as if the few people promoted were anything other than those folk “they” want us to remember. For example, just ask your child or anyone under the age of sixteen to name five important African American’s from our past; you might get three! They don’t teach it and nor do we, which is a shame.

There was a time when our history was never recorded or allowed to be spoken unless it was in the context of the so-called church via the message Master inseminated. You know the jive; “love thy neighbor” and “Thou shalt not kill”, both designed to protect Master and keep his human property in their place and on his place. Our kids don’t know the reality that since the year of our Lord 1619, when Africans were first dragged onto American shores of this place they called “merica.” People of African Descent have been chastised, criticized, punished, beaten, lynched and robbed of its culture.

These atrocities were done while the culprits enjoyed wealth and prosperity as a result of our never ending allegiance and patriotism, often blindly. Even today, when we have ascended to the White House nothing much has changed. Yet, the media and your aspirations of the so-called American dream have you disillusioned, and you continue to submit blindly.

Upon our backs, laden with the stripes of punishment for what they believed was for discipline and in spite of our loyalty, diligence, and tenacity.  Even when they shoot innocent black boys down in the street like defenseless animals – – we loved America  and followed. So you keep praying believing that someday we would come to be accepted and be treated like human beings; men and women.

I’ve written many articles on our historical journey in hopes you may receive explanations told by our ancestors causing you to look at and understand the root-cause of our asymptomatic behaviors. Further, helping you understand that there is a conditioning in “certain” communities that are not excuses, but explanations as to why these behaviors were never unlearned. These behaviors have been past down from generation to generation; blame it on “Willie Lynch,” education, the environment, whatever you want; but the problem is black people continue to wait for them to solve the problem!

It was us who warned about Denmark-Vessey, told you about Gabriel Prosser’s plans, called your attention to Nat Turner, Malcolm, and yes Martin too. It was us who sounded the alarm when old John Brown came calling on Harper’s Ferry, and there are still some sounding warnings today. Black Nationalism has died. We spend a trillion dollars a year. Yet, we bring 95 percent of what it to other businesses while keeping little for itself in spite of the fact that other people controlled at least 90 percent of all the resources and wealth of this nation.

We resisted the messages of trouble making Blacks like Washington, Delaney, Garvey, Bethune, Tubman, and Truth for fighting and dying on the battlefield for us. Most have forgotten their names and take no reverence in their sacrifice. These unique people, a forgiving people, a steadfast people, and a brave people unlike any known to the world fought and gave their lives seeking a better life for you and me. It is disheartening when I look at our station today and see how they are being repaid.

I have said and believe our story, the African American story, is the greatest story ever told because despite and in spite of all of the atrocities endured; we survived! Now, at this moment “Rise-Up You Mighty Race” – take a Stand and say enough is enough. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


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I am the author of the epic thought provoking novel “Just a Season” that has been compared to “a contemporary Roots”. I promise you will see the world through new eyes.

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“Wills pulls you in from the very first page… Just a Season is a heart-wrenching story about growing up and believing in yourself. I highly recommend this book to young men in high school, trying to find themselves and feeling like they have nowhere to turn.” — Cheryl Hayes, APOOO Book Club

“This is the stuff movies are made of… not since Roots have I read anything that so succinctly chronicles an African American story.” One Word phenomenal!!! Cheryl

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Danger To Democracy

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This Court is so far “right leaning” that its legacy will be one that has sustained the American philosophy of divide and conquer pitting every groups interest against what is fair and just with regard to the American people. They have sided with the rich and powerful in every instance working against the principles of democracy. This court believes corporations are persons and their rights are more pronounced than that of actual human citizens.

The Roberts court has decimated voting rights protections and this week overturned the early voting challenge in Ohio, as they seek to intervene in other cases to work against protecting the voting rights of American citizen. I am not sure what planet these five conservative justices live on because they seem to think racism is a thing of the past. The outcome of their future intervention will be interesting because they have decided to accept a housing discrimination case. It appears that this court’s mission is to disenfranchise the American people in every area of protection and human rights.

This court has always sided with the interests of a few, namely business and the one percent. The fact is 90% of business fall into a similar category as this company. So you can see how dangerous this gang is as they continue to determine the course of policy in America. This gang has gone so far as to say a corporation is a “person” and appears to have more rights than people. The court allows big money to buy politicians to assure the interest of the rich – while denying its people the right to vote.

These five Supreme Court justices decision in the Hobby Lobby Case, for example, was based on its history and viewed by most as a further assault on the rights of women. Yet, I saw women cheering the outcome as if it was some sort of victory for them. What is interesting is that the word “Freedom” or “Liberty” is always associated with such bad decision. In this case, in particular, with respect to the Constitution – women were never mentioned. So it was presumed from the beginning women had no rights.

From my perspective, this gang has the saddest record on racial issues in a hundred years. I am sure most will agree that, not unlike Congress, this court stands alongside the worst. In fact, they have said, race is no longer an issue in America. Chief Justice, I beg to differ – race is always an issue and race matters. Affirmative Action, Civil Rights Act, Voting Rights, and the list goes on. This court not only reverses the issues pertinent to African American’s, but women and anyone who isn’t wealthy.

There have always been bad decisions from the Supreme Court. Let’s look back at a few of the worst decisions in history, and let’s hope the nation’s highest court can avoid repeating and continuing these devastating blows to justice.

The Dread Scott Decision has undoubtedly been the absolute worst. Scott, an African American born in the United States, had lived as a slave in both free and slave states. When he tried to sue for his family’s freedom, and was turned down, he took his case to federal court. In one of the most infamous cases in history, the Court ruled Scott could not sue because people of African descent were not protected by the Constitution and not citizens. In one part of the opinion, Chief Justice Taney goes so far as to say blacks were never thought of as any more than possessions:

“The unhappy black race were separated from the white by indelible marks, and laws long before established, and were never thought of or spoken of except as property.”

Number two would have to be Plessey v. Ferguson, which was the landmark decision upholding the constitutionality of state laws requiring racial segregation in public facilities under the doctrine of “separate but equal”; in other words “Jim Crow.” “Separate but equal” remained standard doctrine in U.S. law until its repudiation in the 1954 Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education.

These people are selected by presidents to serve for life, which means the gang of five including the Chief Justice was appointed by republicans with right-wing ideologies. So the legacy of the appointing president last generations after he is gone. In theory, Roberts could remain for another thirty – forty years and base upon what we see from this group, who seems to view minorities and women as non-existent; meaning they may cease to exist in the eyes of the court.

In fact, the Constitution has yet to be changed to include either. Don’t forget slavery was sanctioned and upheld in the name of God! And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


Time To Wake-Up!

5Seems like every once in a while I am compelled to share this message because it behooves me that most of us cannot and has not gotten the message. I am sharing this because there are troubles predicted by our ancestors and too many unresolved problems in society that continue to negatively affect the lives of a people who remain oppressed. Particularly, when the black community is under attack on every front.

Since the year of our Lord 1619, when people from Africa were first dragged onto American shores; African Americans have been chastised, criticized, punished, beaten, robbed, and murdered. All while the culprits have enjoyed wealth and prosperity, as a result, of our never ending allegiance and patriotism, often blindly. Even today, when we have ascended to the White House there are those who castigate much vial abuse upon this uniquely qualified man of African heritage.

We are a unique people, a forgiving people, a steadfast people, and a brave people unlike any known to the world. It was our labor that built this country and responsible for the great wealth America enjoys to this very today. When you look upon America’s enormous wealth, and the power derived from its tremendous control of resources, think about the sacrifices our families made to make all of this possible. We have looked out for this country for hundreds of years and still doing today, which is simply amazing.

Upon our backs, laden with the stripes of punishment for what they believed was for discipline and in spite of our loyalty, diligence and tenacity – we loved America. Even when America refused to allow us even to walk in the shadows, we followed, believing that someday we would come to accepted and treated like men and women. Our strength in the face of adversity is vastly understated.

Our history is one of unbelievable struggles. We’ve been brave on the battlefield, despite being classified as three-fifths of a man. This was, and is, outstanding and frankly beyond the call of duty considering that we have lived through, slavery and under an Apartheid like system. We have raised America’s children, attended to its sick, and prepared their meals while those forefathers were occupied with the trappings of the good life.

In today’s business environment, we do not support each other and just keep doing business with the larger community or in fact any other community. Some say we, as a people, were very successful after slavery ended and even as recently as 1960, but you know what happens when you began to build your own communities and do business with one another – you’re pitted against one another and destroy ourselves.

This is to include our acquiescence to political agendas, abdicating our own economic self-sufficiency, and working so diligently for the economic well-being of other people. Even though the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments were written and many died for the rights described therein. We did not even resist when they changed Black Rights to Civil Rights and allowed virtually every other group to take advantage of them for their progress.

Moreover, we went beyond the pale when we allowed our children to be turned over to the American educational system. With what is being taught to them, it’s likely they will continue in a mode similar to the one we have followed for the past 45 years. Remember, Mr. Lynch when he walked the banks of the James River in 1712. He prophetically said he would make African’s slave for 300 years; little did he realize the truth in his prediction. Last year, 2012, seemed to for fill his prophetic prophecy.

We resisted the messages of trouble-making Blacks like Washington, Delaney, Garvey, Bethune, Tubman, and Truth for fighting and dying on the battlefield for us all. Yet, Mr. Lynch’s message reigns supreme. But with two generations of children going through this education system, we can look forward to at least another 50 years of despair. We can change that come by simply understanding that education is the single most important ingredient necessary to neutralize those forces that breed poverty and despair.

When you continue to do what you’ve always done; you will get what you always got. It is time to “Wake Up”! And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

http://johntwills.com

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Just a Season


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