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Mr. David Ruffin

ruffin

I’ve been blessed to have lived during a time when the music of our culture reached center stage and changed the world. I have heard the voices of many great singers, but none has ever been greater the David Eli Ruffin. I know the Temptation story and not just from the movie.

To tell you the truth I’ve blessed to have had my life enhanced by their music sung by Mr. Ruffin. I have also been blessed to have met several of the group’s members over the years, and one of its lead singers was a good friend, whom I admired and miss dearly. I hear his voice almost daily in song. I wish that friend was Mr. Ruffin, but I am too young to have had that good fortune.

I simply want to pay homage to this man whose music was a huge influence upon my life, particularly my young life, to which I am grateful. I once watched a documentary where his son was interviewed and something he said struck in a profound way. He said, “My daddy wanted love, but he got fame”. We know from the many talented artists who have left us of late that there is a line between triumph and tragedy. That line is often thin and frequently ends sadly.

David Ruffin walked that line with tragic consequences. Ruffin will always be remembered as the mightiest of all the Temptations lead singers. He was one of “the voices” that made the Temptations a legacy and will live on in the depths of our souls. We will always remember that sexy, gritty voice, those trademark glasses, and that stage charisma that sums up the one and only David Ruffin, and even that little crack in his voice was ok, well it wasn’t ok, but that was David Ruffin.

His songs were like windows into his soul, exposing his greatest fears as a lover and a man. Even “happy” songs like “My Girl” brought out vulnerability in his voice. His relationship with the Temptations was a stormy one, but the marriage produced defining moments in 1960’s soul music explosion. His voice inspired just about every singer who sung to include the likes of Rod Stewart, George Michael, Daryl Hall, and Bruce Springsteen, just to name a few – his influence is everlasting. We’ll never know how good he might have been, but we can rejoice in what he left behind.

Born Davis Eli Ruffin, on January 18, 1941 in Whynot, Mississippi. A sickly child, inflicted with both rheumatic fever and asthma. His mother died in childbirth, and he was raised by his father, a Baptist Minister. He was a complex man and master vocalist with a gospel trained voice that would gain him the affection of several generations of listeners, but Ruffin had more than a voice – he had a persona.

In the best of his music, there was a dark, terrible, tragic, and a personal beauty. A good example would be in his self-penned composition “Statue of a Fool”, written when he was just 18 years old, in which he sees himself as a “man who lets love slip through his hands.”

My favorite line in that tune was “On his face, a gold tear should be placed to honor every tear he shed. And I think it would show, and everyone would know, concealed inside is a broken heart.” This was a powerful statement that spoke to the depth of his soul. However, as history would record he would share his most private pain in the Temptations’ biggest hits. Songs like “Ain’t Too Proud To Beg” and “Since I Lost My Baby”, and the chilling “I Wish It Would Rain.

All of these songs were rooted in gospel where David first began singing in The Ruffin Family and The Spiritual Trying Four with his father, his sister Rita Mae, older brothers Jimmy and Quincy. David left home at 13 following his father’s footsteps to practice the ministry, but was sidetracked, singing in Memphis talent shows where he met a young Elvis Presley. He later sang with the gospel group The Dixie Nightingales out of Memphis, Tennessee, and toured with likes of The Womack Brothers, The Swan Silvertones, The Staple Singers, and the Dixie Hummingbirds.

It was with these gospel groups that Ruffin would develop his stage personality, dropping to his knees and doing splits, just like the late Jackie Wilson before him, and David’s show stopping performances within the group would be enough to get him noticed on the secular side.

Then in 1964, when problems arose between the Temptations and group member Elbridge Bryant, David would be invited to join the group. Shortly after David’s arrival, the group would record “The Way You Do The Things You Do”, a Smokey Robinson number with Eddie Kendricks on lead. Gone for a three-week gig in Saginaw, Michigan, the group would return home to find themselves with their first hit. It is said that when David saw the chart standings, he sat down on the long chaise lounge in the Motown lobby, took off his glasses, and cried like a baby.

Ruffin would turn out be an electrifying and dynamic force, when soon after he would bring them their first universal #1 hit, “My Girl”, recorded just before Christmas in 1964, a tune that would turn the group into a household word and legends. The group began turning out one hit after another, and when David took such up-tempo hits as “(I know), I’m Losing You”, to the stage, he became a magnetic field of charisma. His greatness would then shine, and his permanent mark on the pages of history was sealed.

It is reported that Pop Star Michael Jackson paid for his funeral, and numerous celebrities were in attendance at his home going service, including Aretha Franklin, Stevie Wonder, Martha Reeves, Mary Wilson, members of the Temptations, the Four Tops, and the Miracles. At the service, Stevie Wonder told the audience: “We’re confronted with a problem that touches every one of us. We’re confronted with the most devastating slave owner of all times.” Minister Louis Farrakhan, head of the Nation of Islam, who spoke told the mournful audience, “In David there is a lesson. We should not clap our hands and mourn, for he is out of trouble now. You are still in it.”

It is not my intent to rewrite history or to re-tell a story that we all know. Rather to simply say, thank you Mr. Ruffin and to say you are gone – but not forgotten? And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…

 DAVID RUFFIN GETS PERSONAL


                                           

“Just a Season”

http://johntwills.com


RACISM ENDED!!!

2This is the biggest news of our lifetime – “who knew”! This comes as a big surprise to many people of color everywhere. Yes, folks – racism is dead – according to the Republican National Committee, who confirmed the breaking news via a tweet on Sunday. The Republican National Committee issued the BIG NEWS, as they celebrated the 58th anniversary of Rosa Parks refusing to give up her seat on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Alabama, by proclaiming racism has ended.

We know Rosa Parks’ courageous acts and the Montgomery Bus Boycott were indeed crucial protests against a reprehensible, often violent system of racism only compared to Apartheid in South Africa. But, unfortunately conservatives refuse to acknowledge that institutional racism is still pervasive, powerful, and deeply entrenched in voting restrictions, food stamps cuts, and wealth disparities.

Several hours after the GOP declared the end of racism; they retracted their tweet and sent out a new one: “Previous tweet should have read “Today we remember Rosa Parks’ bold stand and her role in fighting to end racism.” But it was too little, too late: Twitter users had already begun posting with “#RacismEndedWhen” to mock the statement.

Sorry to let anyone down, and sadly much to my dismay, racism hasn’t ended! The truth is it has increased since the election of President Obama in 2008 and one could argue that it is more deliberate than at any time in our lifetime and certainly since fifty years ago when Mrs. Parks took her heroic stand.

Following the re-election of Obama in 2012, Colin Powell publicly condemned the GOP’s “dark vein of intolerance” and the party’s repeated use of racial code words to oppose the president and rally white conservative voters. Without mentioning names, Powell singled out former Mitt Romney surrogate and New Hampshire Gov. John Sununu for calling Obama “lazy” and Sarah Palin, who, Powell charged, used slavery-era terms to describe Obama.

When the right-wing comes forward with such a dishonest and disconcerting declaration of such a false reality – lookout, there is a surge a coming! Be careful who you trust because the devil was once an angel. All I can say is VOTE! And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words

976485_10200621438991306_218192175_o (1)It is my great pleasure to introduce you to Nakesha KonstaRantala Williams, one of the most elegant and photogenic models from the Washington DC Metropolitan Area. Nakesha is not only a model, but a poet and soon to be an author with a persona that exudes style and grace. Nakesha’s dream and passion burned within her soul early in life. She began modeling around the age of fifteen years old participating in local talent events. Most notable as a participant in the Ms. Teen Washington DC Pageant, coming in as one of the top ten finalists.  

It was from that moment; she knew she had a date with destiny and her passion took over dedicating the rhythm of her soul to for-fill a dream. She knew exactly what she wanted to do, brighten the stage with her presence. Her charm and grace lead to her being able to adapt and grow in every area of the profession that took her to places she had, to this point, only imagined. She has worked various modeling positions including print and runway. What is remarkable about this unique beauty is that her soul is present in every image captured.

We have all heard the cliché that some people have something called “IT”. Nakesha has “IT”! Her style is creative and edgy with a bold touch of sensuality and passion for her love. Moreover, her femininity is ever present and clearly seen in all of her work, which speaks to her spirit that comes from deep within her soul.

She has educated herself on the latest trends and styles in both clothing and accessories that are relevant to the public imagery to reflect the latest fashion styles. She is an expert in her ability to apply makeup to achieve specific effects and versatile in hair styling, knowing that both talents are helpful tools for a person in this profession.

418533_3157604171923_960969865_n (1)Nakesha effectively utilizes her appearance and natural chemistry at fashion shows and in all forms of modeling. She is comfortable as she works in promotional production settings, including still photography sessions, video recordings, and venues featuring live fashion shows on runways. Nakesha is available for all modeling assignments and works well in all environments to include especially stores, retail stores, commercial showrooms and custom salons. With a passion for fashion and design, she convincingly portrays a wide range of ages, styles and personalities which is her forte.

Nakesha wishes to thank photographers: Ceasar, Pedro Bauza and Andre Dunston with Epic Media Photography, and also the Barbone Modeling Agency for their support.

Besides being charismatic and photogenic, Nakesha is an Artist and a Poet, who loves to create images and poems that will touch your soul. She is now writing a book of poems, due to be released in early 2014.

A portfolio of photographs depicting her many moods and dispositions is available, if you follow the links below. She has what it takes to be a successful model because Nakesha has “IT”!

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My Websites 

                http://nakesha20720.wix.com/nakeshathmodel
                         www.modelmayhem.com/blondvixen
                                FaceBook “The Model’s Page”
 
                                      John T. Wills Media Kit

Marissa Alexander Freed

breaking newsFor the first time in a long while there is good news out of Florida!!! Marissa Alexander the Florida woman sentenced to 20 years in prison after firing a “warning shot” during an argument with her abusive husband has been released on bond while she awaits retrial under a controversial part of the state’s self-defense law. What a wonderful holiday gift!

The case of Marissa Alexander, who was convicted of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, touched off a furor when her supporters compared it to the self-defense case of George Zimmerman, who was acquitted earlier this year of murdering an unarmed black teenager. Some have compared these two cases and the law as simply “black and white. Whereas, no one was injured in Alexander’s case, the court gave her a 20-year prison sentence under the state’s mandatory minimum sentencing guidelines because she had fired a gun during the assault.

A state appeals court ruled in September that Alexander, who is black, deserved a new trial because the judge failed to properly instruct the Jacksonville, Fla., jury about her self-defense argument. She was convicted in May 2012. “This news is vindication for Marissa and all the women who have become criminalized for exercising their basic right to defend themselves and their children,” Angie Nixon of Florida New Majority, a social justice organization, said of Alexander’s release.

The case drew criticism from civil rights groups concerned about self-defense laws and mandatory minimum sentencing rules, but it received little attention outside north Florida until the Zimmerman case. Zimmerman was arrested for killing Trayvon Martin in 2012 and was acquitted of murder and manslaughter in July 2013.

Under the so-called “Stand Your Ground” clause added to Florida’s self-defense law in 2005, people who use deadly force to defend themselves from serious injury – rather than retreating to avoid confrontation – can be immune from prosecution. Zimmerman never sought immunity under “Stand Your Ground,” instead relying on a standard self-defense law. Alexander’s “Stand Your Ground” claim was rejected because she left the house during the confrontation to retrieve a gun from her car, returning to fire a shot near her husband Rico Gray’s head.

A slightly built woman who stands 5 feet 2 inches, Alexander said her 245-pound husband was about to attack her when she fired into a kitchen wall during the August 2010 incident. He had previously been convicted of domestic violence for attacking her. Prosecutors said the shot endangered Gray. At the time, Alexander had an active restraining order against her husband and she carried a concealed weapons permit.

Source: CBS News


The Day Innocence Died – The Autopsy

42 horsemenAll of us have watched CSI and therefore know how important an autopsy is in any death  and is the most significant piece of evidence in a crime. The autopsy of JFK according to experts was, at best, the worst ever recorded. This study of the autopsy photos finds that JFK was shot four times from the right front by at least three different guns none of which were fired from the Sixth Floor School Book Depository. If any one of these bullets occurred as supported by the evidence of the autopsy photos a conspiracy existed.

Some claim that Oswald fired three additional shots one of which struck Connally in the back without hitting JFK thus creating confusion. At least seven bullets were fired November 22, 1963. Expert’s also claim given Oswald’s shooting record and the condition of the Carcano it is clear that Oswald could not have hit anything and was never intended to actually shoot JFK or even hit the car. Oswald was intended as a patsy to divert attention away from the true assassins by blaming Russia or Cuba.

When Kennedy’s body arrived at Bethesda Naval Hospital an autopsy was conducted. The autopsy found the four bullet wounds from the right front as described above. The Kennedy family was informed of the findings as was President Johnson and Hover of the FBI but orders for secrecy were given to all others in the interest of national security. After Oswald’s death Dr. Humes burns the original autopsy report and his notes. A multitude of evidence is destroyed, lost, altered and fabricated. Once commenced the cover up cannot fail.

As a side note to what is known, Jackie Kennedy left some secret papers to be opened only after the death of all her children. Perhaps she will tell us what really happened and why. An error in judgment or otherwise can only be corrected by fixing it and in this case by revealing the truth.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this series is that of the presenters and does not necessarily reflect the views of the author. It is information that is in the public domain provided for the reader to form an opinion. Whereas, it is the author’s position that the most profound sin is a tragedy unremembered and the absence of truth. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

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The Day Innocence Died – The Magic Bullet Theory

4There are so many mysteries, myths, and dare I say lies connect to the JFK assassination, particularly as it relates to what the official story reports. One of the most interesting and unbelievable aspects of the Warren Commission report was what have been christened as the “Magic Bullet theory. If you believe what the conspiracy books say about the Warren Commission believed about the fantasy called the Single Bullet Theory, you would have to conclude the commissioners and staff of the commission were a bunch of fools.

The single (magic) bullet theory according to the commission went like this: a three-centimeter (1.2”)-long copper-jacketed lead-core 6.5-millimeter rifle bullet fired from the sixth floor of the Texas School Book Depository passed through President Kennedy’s neck and Governor Connally’s chest and wrist and embedded itself in the Governor’s thigh. This means the bullet traversed 15 layers of clothing, 7 layers of skin, and approximately 15 inches of tissue, struck a necktie knot, removed 4 inches of rib, and shattered a radius bone. Yet, this bullet was found on a gurney in the corridor at the Parkland Memorial Hospital completely intact and in nearly pristine condition. This bullet became a key Commission exhibit, identified as CE 399.

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Disclaimer: The information contained in this series is that of the presenters and does not necessarily reflect the views of the author. It is information that is in the public domain provided for the reader to form an opinion. Whereas, it is the author’s position that the most profound sin is a tragedy unremembered and the absence of truth. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

Fifty-years later the question remains “who done it”?

Follow the series “The Day Innocence Died”…


The Day Innocence Died – The Warren Commission

4The President’s Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy, known unofficially as the Warren Commission, established by President Lyndon Johnson, November 29, 1963, to investigate the Kennedy murder. The report is the government’s official version of the assassination that concluded that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone in killing Kennedy and wounding Texas Governor John Connally and that Jack Ruby also acted alone when he killed Oswald two days later. The Commission’s 889-page final report has proven controversial by later studies.

The Commission took its unofficial name, the Warren Commission, from its chairman, Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren. According to published transcripts of Johnson’s presidential phone conversations, some major officials were opposed to forming such a commission and several commission members took part only with extreme reluctance. One of their chief reservations was that a commission would ultimately create more controversy than consensus, and those fears proved valid.

Commission Members

The Commission conducted its business primarily in closed sessions, but these were not secret sessions.

“Two misconceptions about the Warren Commission hearing need to be clarified…hearings were closed to the public unless the witness appearing before the Commission requested an open hearing. No witness except one…requested an open hearing… Second, although the hearings (except one) were conducted in private, they were not secret.”

In a secret hearing, the witness is instructed not to disclose his testimony to any third party, and the hearing testimony is not published for public consumption. The witnesses who appeared before the Commission were free to repeat what they said to anyone they pleased, and all of their testimony was subsequently published in the first fifteen volumes put out by the Warren Commission.”

In November 1964, two months after the publication, the Commission published twenty-six volumes of supporting documents, including the testimony or depositions of 552 witnesses and more than 3,100 exhibits. All of the commission’s records were then transferred on November 23 to the National Archives. The unpublished portion of those records was initially sealed for 75 years (to 2039) under a general National Archives policy that applied to all federal investigations by the executive branch of government, a period “intended to serve as protection for innocent persons who could otherwise be damaged because of their relationship with participants in the case.”

In 1992, the Assassination Records Review Board was created by the JFK Records Act to collect and preserve the documents relating to the assassination. It pointed out in its final report:

Doubts about the Warren Commission’s findings were not restricted to ordinary Americans. Well before 1978, President Johnson, Robert Kennedy, and four of the seven members of the Warren Commission all articulated, if sometimes off the record, some level of skepticism about the Commission’s basic findings.

The Committee concluded in their final report that the Commission was reasonably thorough and acted in good faith, but failed to adequately address the possibility of conspiracy. This was in hindsight the greatest crock known to man because the commission members were mere puppets. So the question becomes “for who”?

Disclaimer: The information contained in this series is that of the presenters and does not necessarily reflect the views of the author. It is information that is in the public domain provided for the reader to form an opinion. Whereas, it is the author’s position that the most profound sin is a tragedy unremembered and the absence of truth. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

Follow the series “The Day Innocence Died”…


The Day Innocence Died – The Getaway

4Conspiracy theorists have alleged when the new President left Dallas on the afternoon of November 22, 1963, it was more of a getaway than returning the body of the murdered president to Washington.

As a result of the fifty-year mark of the assassination of John F. Kennedy many different views and theories have been provided, over the past few weeks, to insert knowledge of the event to add to the discussion. With most of living America either too young or told an official story that was suspect, at best.

One such view comes from the son of a former Pentagon Counter Intelligence officer who tells the story of how his father, a Military agency insider Col. Christensen, reveals to his family what actually happened in Dallas on 11/22/63 and why it happened.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this series is that of the presenters and does not necessarily reflect the views of the author. It is information that is in the public domain provided for the reader to form an opinion. Whereas, it is the author’s position that the most profound sin is a tragedy unremembered and the absence of truth. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

Follow the series “The Day Innocence Died”…


The Day Innocence Died – Secrets

Friday November 22, 2013 will mark one of, if not, the most monumental event of modern history – the assassination of an American president. From that day, America changed, which was I suppose was the purpose of the day innocence died. Those involved in perpetrating the crime and some say cover-up, may well have gotten away with the crime of the century.

In the attached video, the author asks a very basic question – after fifty years, why not release the more that fifty-thousand secret documents on the matter so that the truth can be revealed?

Disclaimer: The information contained in this series is that of the presenters and does not necessarily reflect the views of the author. It is information that is in the public domain provided for the reader to form an opinion. Whereas, it is the author’s position that the most profound sin is a tragedy unremembered and the absence of truth. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

Follow the series “The Day The Dream Died”…


The Day Innocence Died – Kennedy and Race

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Race relations in American history have been disgraceful and more horrific treatment imposed upon African America’s than any other people ever to walk the earth. People of African descent have been enslaved, segregated, and maligned for all of America’s history, yet have remained supremely devoted and loyal. I can now understand what it must have been like when President Lincoln fought to end slavery and then was assassinated. It must have felt like their last hope was gone. Respectively, when President Kennedy was killed most African America’s relived the pain of their ancestors.  

In the 1960s one would surely find three portraits hung in just about every African American home; Jesus represented unconditional hope, strength and love; Dr. King personified the moral crusade that ended legal segregation, and there was President John F. Kennedy, who holds an important, but complicated place in black history when we look back the time in which he lived.

It’s been fifty-years since the death of Kennedy and as time has passes we’re still trying to figure it out what he might have done for civil rights had he not been killed. For sure, African American’s placed hope in this man akin to that invested in Abraham Lincoln in terms of our obtaining the long awaited equality, as they both sympathized with the black struggle like no other president before them.

During Kennedy’s time in office, he did speak eloquently against segregation despite resistance from Southern racists in his own Democratic party. Some even feel that his support for civil rights was one reason he was killed, even though racial motives seldom featured prominently among the many theories about Kennedy’s death.

The impact of his death in many African American homes at the time was like that of losing a family member. Its effect was like a big cloud over the whole black community, an aura of hopelessness. Just look back at the pictures of the funeral, you see so many black people out there crying. Mind you, this was at a time when African Americans were barred from most, if not all, public accommodations.

In a speech soon after meeting Dr. King, Kennedy spoke of the “moving examples of moral courage” shown by civil rights protesters. Their peaceful demonstrations, he said, were not “to be lamented, but a great sign of responsibility, of good citizenship, of the American spirit.” He went on to reference the growing “sit-in” movement, in which black customers demanded service at white-only restaurants, Kennedy said: “It is in the American tradition to stand up for one’s rights even if the new way to stand up for one’s rights is to sit down.”

Let’s be clear; he was a white man and wanted to steer clear of the issue of race for political reasons. However, he endeared himself to the African American community when Dr. King was in jail. Over the objections of his brother and campaign manager, Robert Kennedy, an aide managed to convince the candidate to place a sympathetic call to King’s pregnant wife, Coretta. Soon thereafter, Robert Kennedy called the judge. Suddenly, bail was granted, and King was freed.

The story of the Kennedys’ involvement made headlines in black newspapers nationwide. King issued a statement saying he was “deeply indebted to then Senator Kennedy,” although he remained nonpartisan. The Kennedy campaign printed tens of thousands of pamphlets describing the episode and distributed them in black churches across the country on the Sunday before the presidential election. He would get 78 percent of the black vote, won the election by one of the narrowest margins in U.S. history.

When Kennedy became president, his top priority was foreign policy. There were enormous Cold War challenges, from the Soviet Union and Vietnam to Cuba the site of the failed Bay of Pigs invasion and of the crisis over Soviet missiles that threatened to trigger a nuclear war. At the same time, the civil rights movement was boiling and could not be ignored. “Freedom Riders” seeking to integrate Southern bus lines were mercilessly beaten. Whites rioted to prevent the black student James Meredith from enrolling at the University of Mississippi; two people were killed after Kennedy sent in troops to ensure Meredith’s admission.

In Birmingham, Ala., police loosed clubs, dogs and fire hoses on peaceful protesters, and a church bombing killed four black girls. Images of the violence shamed America before the world and as African American blood flowed, Kennedy moved cautiously toward civil rights legislation. Publicly, the Kennedy administration was reluctant to intervene in the Southern violence unless federal law was being flouted. Privately, Kennedy’s men urged protest leaders to slow down and avoid confrontation.

In light of foreign policy issues, civil rights simply was not a top priority. It could be said that he allowed J. Edgar Hoover, head of the FBI, to deal with the Negro problem, which was a bad idea. Hoover believed the growing civil rights movement was under Communist influence and a threat to national security. He closely monitored King and others in the movement with surveillance, informants and wiretaps. He went so far as to refuse to warn King as it routinely warned other potential targets. In spite of Kennedy publically working with King, even as his FBI tried to tear King down, he paid both sides of the issue.

Kennedy also opposed to the March on Washington using the argument that he wanted success in the Congress for any civil rights legislation. In the end, the peaceful mass march made headlines around the world. Kennedy watched it on television. Immediately afterward, he met with march leaders in the White House, where they discussed civil rights legislation that was finally inching through Congress. The leaders pressed Kennedy to strengthen the legislation; the president listed many obstacles.

During a speech at San Diego State College in June 1963 Kennedy said, “Our goal must be an educational system in the spirit of the declaration of independence — a system in which all are created equal,” Kennedy said. “A system in which every child, whether born a banker’s son in a Long Island mansion, or a Negro sharecropper’s son in an Alabama cotton field, has every opportunity for an education that his abilities and character deserve.” This was dangerous for the time and not acceptable language by the dominant culture. This put him on the enemy list not only for political retribution, but for death.

If it were not for the 50th anniversary of his death few African Americans would mention his name. Young people barely remember him; there are no aging portraits on the walls, and certainly he is not remembered as a civil rights icon. It was his successor, President Johnson, who receives credit for hammering through the monumental Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act, which ensured full citizenship for African-Americans.

Whether Kennedy might have achieved anything substantial on civil rights or for black people, we will never know but he was a breath of fresh air, youthful, dynamic, and in my view a new visionary type of leader full of optimism and hope.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this series is that of the presenters and does not necessarily reflect the views of the author. It is information that is in the public domain provided for the reader to form an opinion. Whereas, it is the author’s position that the most profound sin is a tragedy unremembered and the absence of truth. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


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