Tag Archives: Howard University

Remembering Dr. Frances Cress Welsing

15826522_1601482106532343_2285311203869775550_nIt’s been a year now that we lost this great woman of conscience. Last year was a horrible year because so many icons of black history made the transition to be with our ancestors. On this day a year ago, we lost a giant, Dr. Frances Cress Welsing, born Frances Luella Cress, who was blessed to live an extraordinary life and opened the eyes of many people to which I am grateful for the knowledge she shared with the world. Dr. Welsing was an Afro-centrist and a renowned psychiatrist, who with her 1970 essay The Cress Theory of Color-Confrontation and Racism (White Supremacy) offered her interpretation of the origins of white supremacy.

She was the author of The Isis Papers (1991) and The Keys to the Colors (1991). In her writing, Welsing discusses that white people are the result of a genetic mutation of albinism and are the outcast offspring of the original peoples of Africa. Welsing caused controversy after she said that homosexuality among African-Americans was a ploy by white males to decrease the black population.

Dr. Welsing was born Frances Luella Cress in Chicago, Illinois, on March 18, 1935, and in 1957, she earned a B.S. degree at Antioch College and in 1962 received an M.D. at Howard University. She moved to Washington, DC in the 1960s and worked at many hospitals, especially children’s hospitals.

Welsing states that a system is practiced by the global white minority, on both conscious and unconscious levels, to ensure their genetic survival by any means necessary. According to Welsing, this system attacks people of color, particularly people of African descent, in the nine major areas of people’s activity: economics, education, entertainment, labor, law, politics, religion, sex, and war. Welsing believes that it is imperative that people of color, especially people of African descent, understand how the system of white supremacy works to dismantle it and bring true justice to planet Earth.

Dr. Welsing is famously known for her groundbreaking novel The Isis Papers where in it, she states the melanin theory, which white people are the genetically defective descendants of albino mutants. She also states that because of this “defective” mutation, they may have been forcibly expelled from Africa, among other possibilities.

Welsing suggests that, because it is so easy for pure whiteness to be genetically lost during interracial mixing, White-skinned people developed an aggressive colonial urge and their societies dominated others militarily to preserve this White-skinned purity. Welsing ascribes certain inherent and behavioral differences between black and white people to a “melanin deficiency” in white people. Welsing proposes what she calls a “functional definition of racism.”

Functional Definition of Racism = White Supremacy = Apartheid. As a black behavioral scientist and practicing psychiatrist, my own functional definition of racism (white supremacy) is as follows: Racism (white supremacy) is the local and global power system and dynamic, structured, maintained by persons who classify themselves as white, whether consciously or subconsciously determined; which consists of patterns of perception, logic, symbol formation, thought, speech, action, and emotional response, as conducted, simultaneously in all areas of people activity (economics, education, entertainment, labor, law, politics, religion, sex, and war); for the ultimate purpose of white genetic survival and to prevent white genetic annihilation on planet Earth – a planet upon which the vast and overwhelming majority of people are classified as non-white (black, brown, red and yellow) by white skinned people, and all of the nonwhite people are genetically dominant (in terms of skin coloration) compared to the genetic recessive white-skinned people.

Welsing discusses her “Unified Field Theory Psychiatry” as a broader framework, encompassing biology, psychology, and physics, as a prerequisite to understanding the etiology of a unified field of energy phenomena, specifically the “behavior-energy” underlying racial conflict. She states that her position is more analogous to the “determinist” model of physicist Albert Einstein than to the “indeterminacy” theories of Max Born and Werner Heisenberg. Furthermore, she asserts that both homosexuality and sexism are necessarily derived from this behavior-energy system.

Dr. Welsing has been criticized, wrongly I think, for stating that black male homosexuality was imposed on the black man by the white man in order to reduce the black population. Whereas White homosexuality is a sign of weakness, and that homosexual patterns of behavior are simply expressions of black male self-submission to other males in the area of sex, as well as in other areas such as economics, education, entertainment, labor, law, politics, religion, and war.

Dr. Welsing was a brilliant woman and a profound forward thinker on African American topics unheard of before her work. Sadly, the good doctor suffered a Stroke on January 1, 2016, and was placed in critical condition, where she later died in a Washington DC area hospital on the morning of January 2, 2016, at the age of 80. Her passing was a crippling loss to the black conscious community, and she will be sorely missed. My prayers are that she is resting in power. And that’s my thought provoking…


The History Of Georgetown In Washington DC

e361da2724400e3a212a7f1a90b19fc9Let me take you on a journey exploring the rich history of Georgetown, once a black community that has become little more than a footnote in the annals of time with respect to its origin. Georgetown, just down the street from the White House, was part of the unholy system imposed upon people of color commonly referred to as “Jim Crow” and every city or town in America had such a place during segregation.

The entire world knows DC is the capital and symbol of the free world with its avenues of grand marble structures that are more or less a crystallization of magnificence for tourist to admire. These magnificent architectural marvels are symbols of the power associated with America’s wealth built on the backs of slaves. This area downtown is known as the Federal Triangle because it is an area established for federal government entities.

However, there is a hidden Washington that some call a tale of two cities. Just blocks for these symbols of opulence live the disenfranchised, downtrodden, and neighborhoods of the forgotten. Before 1967, the city was run by and under federal control, which is why it is called a District – i.e., the District of Columbia. It was President Johnson who appointed Walter Washington, an African American, as the city’s first-ever Mayor-Commissioner in an effort that came to be known as home rule.

The city has always been predominately African American with no real authority over its direction. The “District” as many locals call it was nothing more than a sleepy southern town not much different from any town in South Carolina or Mississippi as far as blacks were concerned. It was run by Dixiecrats to this point, and the Dixiecrats were worst than what we know today a Conservatives or Republicans. What you may not know, even today Washington has no voting representation in Congress making the capital of the free world basically a plantation.

Washington has many African American enclaves that have long storied histories, but did you know Georgetown, one of Washington’s most renowned upscale communities, was once one of them. It is probably best known today as the home of Georgetown University and its championship basketball teams; coached by the legendary John Thompson, and now by his son. There were many luminous NBA sports figures produced by the institution. You may also know Georgetown because of its world-renowned nightlife, shopping or maybe a place home to famous people. One of its most famous residents was a young John Kennedy and his new bride Jackie, who called Georgetown home before moving into the White House.

It is also worth mentioning that many notable African American figures resided in communities around town such as the great orator Frederick Douglass, who owned a home in Anacostia. Carter G. Woodson the creator of the concept “Black History Month” also owned a home in the city. These great men and many prominent African American politicians, artists, entrepreneurs, scholars, athletes and socialites were relegated to live in a town divided by the harsh separate but equal laws of the day.

Georgetown began as a Maryland tobacco port on the banks of the Potomac River in 1751. When Congress created the District of Columbia to be the nation’s capital in 1791, its 10-mile square boundaries were drawn to include this port town, as well as the very similar Virginia tobacco port of Alexandria just across the river. Alexandria was given back to Virginia in 1846, but Georgetown remains as one of Washington’s most lively urban neighborhoods.

Georgetown historically had a large African American population, including both slaves and free blacks. Slave labor was widely used in the construction of new buildings in Washington just as they were used to provide labor on tobacco plantations in Maryland and Virginia. Let me be very clear, slaves and their labor were the workforces that built the White House, Capital, and most of the grand marble structures of opulence.

Georgetown was also a major slave-trading depot that dates back as early as 1760. John Beattie established his business on O Street and conducted business at other locations called “pens” around Wisconsin Avenue and M Street with both locations being just a short distance from the White House. Slave trading continued until the mid-19th century, when it was ended on April 16, 1862. Many former slaves moved to Georgetown following their freedom establishing this thriving community.

When African Americans settled in Georgetown, the free men established the Mount Zion United Methodist Church that remains today, which is the oldest African American congregation in Washington. This feat due to their strong religious convictions was a testament to their fortitude after experiencing the horrors of slavery. Mount Zion also provided a cemetery for free burials to Washington’s earlier African American population. Before establishing the church, free blacks and slaves went to the Dumbarton Methodist Church where they were restricted to hot, overcrowded balcony.

I’m sure a sense of extreme prided was evident in Washington at the time because it became the home of Howard University. Although not in Georgetown, this preeminent university was established for Blacks in 1867 with the aid of the Freedmen’s Bureau. It was named for the commissioner of the Freedmen’s Bureau, General Oliver Otis Howard. The Freedmen’s Bureau was intended to help solve everyday problems of the newly freed slaves, but its most widely recognized achievement was its accomplishments in the area of education. Before the Civil War, no southern state had a system of universal, state-supported public education for “Coloreds” but Washington now had an advanced school of learning.

In the early twentieth century, new construction of large apartment buildings began on the edge of Georgetown. The eyes of the elite became trained on the area. John Ihlder led efforts to take advantage of new zoning laws to get restrictions enacted on construction in Georgetown. However, legislators largely ignored concerns about the historic preservation of Georgetown until 1950, when Public Law 808 was passed establishing the historic district of “Old Georgetown.” The law required the United States Commission of Fine Arts to be consulted on any alteration, demolition, or building construction within the historic district. As you can imagine, this proper and official sounding solution was not designed to benefit the African American citizens living in Georgetown.

Georgetown began to emerge as a fashion and cultural center of the newly identified community. While many “old families” stayed in Georgetown, the neighborhood’s population became poorer and more racially diverse. Its demographics started to shift as a wave of new post-war residents arrived, many politically savvy, well-educated, and people from elite backgrounds took a keen interest in the neighborhood’s historic nature for their own benefit. It was during this time that the Citizens Association of Georgetown was formed. It is my understanding that the Old Georgetown Act was really a polite, or maybe not so polite, way of saying gentrification.

I am not implying nor suggesting that the Act was designed to remove African American’s and poor residences from the community (wink). But it did create an environment where people of low to moderate income could no longer afford to live there. High-end developments and gentrification have revitalized the formally African American neighborhood and what was viewed as a blighted industrial waterfront.

Some say, what happened in simple terms according to the thinking of the day; someone decided to trade a penny for a pound, and very effectively. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

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