Tag Archives: Legacy

The Greatest Story Ever Told

462_160In thinking about the times in which we’ve lived I can say without a doubt our history ‘is the greatest story ever told’. I am always reminded of the ghosts of the greats who blazed a might trail for us to walk. Black History Month, as short as it is, should be celebrated and taught all year long! It is our responsibility. I was blessed to have had the good privilege to live during the civil rights era to witness groups and individuals fight to end racial segregation and the unequal treatment of black people, which we should never have had to fight in the first place.

Of all the things I am grateful for; is to have lived long enough to witness something ‘no one living or dead’ ever thought would happen. Which was to witness a Black Man elected to be President of these United States of America! To see him and his lovely family exhibit the style and grace representing black people in an extra exemplary way making us proud.

It would be my hope that all of us take this opportunity during Black History Month to reach one – teach one. Share the stories of our struggle with the children. I have added a few of the many significant events and some of the brave and courageous soldiers in the army that changed America or dare I say the world.

Events in the Civil Rights Movement

Solders of the Civil Rights Movement

I am reminded of Malcolm X who used to say “Make It Plain” which meant in essence to bring forth the knowledge. And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…


Black Leadership: Consistent Nothingness

2It has been said that leaders are born and not made. I want to take that cliché a step further and say that black leadership today, or “Our so-called leaders are not born, they are appointed” by those who do not have your best interest at heart (the oppressor). Think about that for a moment! Just because these people get media exposure or stand in front of a large crowd, does not make them your leader or someone who speaks for all black people.

Black people are too quick to have an emotional orgasm when it comes to these folks. The truth is, more often than not, these folks are bought, paid for, and have sold out. In other words, it’s about money, i.e., yes they sold-out! Can you remember being at a meeting where their message had your input? The debacle of last year with the NAACP is a good example of the dire state of black leadership. In this case, a white woman pretending to be black was elected to be president of that local chapter.

First, let’s understand that media is designed for one purpose, and that is to be a misinformation vehicle. Hence, by design it needs agents appointed/hired by those who control your thinking. Don’t you think “they” remember the truth and empowerment given by Brother Malcolm, which I believe was the reason, they killed him. They know history and remember Nat Turner and all will be done to make sure someone like him NEVER appears again. In other words, there is no leader today that is willing to give their life for the cause!

I am not going to call out anyone, in particular, because we know who they are; in fact, there is not one so-call black leader I would follow anywhere! For example, whenever there is a disturbance or uprising the first thing they do is prop up every preacher or anyone carrying a Bible to give the message of peace and non-violence! So the more important question is; why is it that we need a leader appointed by others? No other group or culture requires such misinformation agents or sell-outs in their mists. Is it something like a savior complex or is it the residual of slavery?

The African American culture has forever relied on a “Council of Elders” to guide and direct the lives of its people. These were people with wisdom, and let me say that wisdom is very different from education. In most cases, those who look like us that are put in front of us most often are sent with a script. Further, take notice to what they say and what topics they stay away from. These folks are called provocation agents, whose job is to make you believe what they are told to tell you to believe!

We have heard this term “Black Leadership.” Let me ask this; when did you vote for anyone of these talking heads. Our leader should be chosen by us – not appointed by others. Now, take it a step further; where are they leading us too! Compare it to the good reverend who leads you, in many cases, away from reality. Yet, like sheep, we follow blindly. We have to begin to think and not listen to false prophets!

The Freedom of Information Act has allowed us to obtain information about many of these so-called leaders, and their associates were government operatives while pretending to be on the front lines fighting for our struggles. These agents were with Malcolm and Martin and Garvey and trust me they are around today. Maybe it’s time that we become part of what’s called the “Common Sense Party” where you can see the forest for the trees! This might allow you to remove yourself from that mental bondage that makes you a slave.

I would suggest that you know who you follow and be careful of that messenger who claims to speak for you. So when you follow or believe a message of someone who calls them-self a leader, remember this; not everything that is faith can change things but nothing can be changed until you have faith. So don’t lose sleep over the opinions of sheep. Have faith in you! And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


The History Of Thanksgiving

2The Holiday Season is upon us, and Thanksgiving is a special day to enjoy with family and friends. It welcomes the transition from Fall to Winter and the marvels it brings. A time of joy and hope! I have said many times “nothing is as it seems,” as the truth or true history is never told or taught with regard to what really happen or how it is that we celebrate most holidays. Therefore, as we enjoy the graciously prepared food on this day; think about the real history of Thanksgiving.

Let’s go back in time. It was in September 1620 when a tiny ship called the Mayflower left Plymouth, England, carrying 102 passengers of an assorted cast of religious separatists or as we might call them today – religious zealots. They set out seeking a new home where they could freely practice their faith with individuals lured by the promise of prosperity and land ownership in the New World.

The journey across the Atlantic was treacherous and an uncomfortable crossing that lasted sixty-six days before they dropped anchor near Cape Cod, far north of their intended destination at the mouth of the Hudson River. After about a month, the Mayflower crossed Massachusetts Bay where the Pilgrims, as they are now commonly known, began the work of establishing a village at Plymouth. They saw that there were no fences, so the thought the land was theirs for the taking, and they did just that – took it.

The first winter was brutal causing most of the colonists to remain on board the ship, where they suffered from exposure, scurvy, and outbreaks of contagious disease. Only half of the Mayflower’s original passengers and crew lived to see their first spring in the so-called new world. It wasn’t until spring that the remaining settlers moved ashore, where they received an astonishing visit from an Abenaki Indian, who greeted them in English. Shortly after that, he returned with another Native American, Squanto, a member of the Pawtuxet tribe.  Squanto had been kidnapped by an English sea captain and sold into slavery before escaping to London returning to his homeland on an exploratory expedition.

Squanto was the person who taught the Pilgrims, who were starving and sick, how to cultivate corn, extract sap from maple trees, catch fish in the rivers and avoid poisonous plants. He also helped the settlers forge an alliance with the Wampanoag, a local tribe, which would endure for more than 50 years and tragically remains one of the sole examples of harmony between European colonists and Native Americans.

In November 1621, after the Pilgrims’ first corn harvest proved successful, Governor William Bradford organized a celebratory feast and invited a group of the fledgling colony’s Native American allies, including the Wampanoag chief Massasoit. This is the beginning of what is now remembered as American’s “first Thanksgiving”; although the Pilgrims themselves may not have used the term, at the time, history reports that the festival lasted three days.

As you can imagine, there is no record of the historic banquet’s exact menu, the Pilgrim chronicler Edward Winslow wrote in his journal that Governor Bradford sent four men on a “fowling” mission in preparation for the event and that the Wampanoag guests arrived bearing five deer. Historians have suggested that many of the dishes were likely prepared using traditional Native American spices and cooking methods. Because the Pilgrims had no oven and the Mayflower’s sugar supply had dwindled by the fall of 1621, the meal did not feature pies, cakes or other desserts, which have become a hallmark of contemporary celebrations.

What most people don’t know it that after that Thanksgiving was not celebrated each year, rather it was a celebration had after a major victory resulting from a battle in a war. It was not until the Civil War that Abraham Lincoln did the holiday become a national holiday celebrated each year. Today as with all holidays, it has become an economic extension of capitalism. In spite of its history, I wish you and yours a safe and blessed day. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


A Queen In Name Only

1zIt is a fact that the black woman is the foundation of the African American Diaspora. There is no doubt the black woman is the greatest gift given to the world. She is the most powerful force ever created and the mother of life. Therefore, it is an honor to say she is our foundation, but our rock is crumbling and that means so is our salvation; causing much despair and possibly our extinction.

In the last thirty – forty years or so, something happened. We seemed to have forsaken the struggles that bound all black people to join the causes of everyone else who claims to have an issue. It’s called divide and conquer!

If you follow Thought Provoking Perspectives, you know I don’t shy away from controversy, rather offer hard truths or at least give you something to think about. Sometimes these truths are disturbing, as is this documentary, but more often than not; I hope my words produce thought and hopefully leading to solutions. If nothing else it may cause you to view thing from a different perspective.

One of my followers sent me this documentary that is the first in the groundbreaking series that lay out in INTELLIGENT terms, according to the producer, why Black America is in dire straights. It speaks to issues, such as; where the black woman went wrong. Whether you agree with what’s said in the video or not; the African American Diaspora is in trouble. So the question is; what can be done to bring about unity?

Let’s talk about it!

What say you!


The Unspoken Truth

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I celebrate Black History every day – 365 days a year. It has been nearly 400 years since that fateful or should I say infamous day in the year of our Lord 1619. When the first African was dragged onto the shores of this place the slaves called “merica.” Sadly, to this day – not much has changed regarding our destiny.These people were physical slaves, but today most are locked in mental bondage.

Sure there are a few black faces in high places but what about the masses of the race. This group still, for the most part, remain in a destitute situation compared to the “Real Americans”. Therefore, through this blog, I write articles specifically designed to be a potent source of empowering knowledge for the enhancement of the minds of mankind.

In today’s world, they tell us that the gay movement is the new civil rights movement and that black people have “overcome.” Like Malcolm told us; we have been, hoodwinked! Black people have yet, in spite of government law, to obtain their rights as a human beings and nothing close to what is called civil rights. It is my sincere wish that black people not continue to fall into the trap of divide and conquer, which has worked so well for so long. Let us understand the phenomenal history and difficult struggles of the African American experience and learn from the mistakes of the past. Our story is the “Greatest Story Ever Told!!!

The legacy of dependency, apathy, and entrenchment of the American social order from its beginning provides clear evidence of those with a diabolical intent to bankrupt the souls of African Americans based on an ideology of supremacy. The remnants of stolen souls exist today within the people of color, who bear the burden of a system that perpetrated, in the name of God, the greatest crime known to man. Hence, from the beginning, people of African descent were intended to be a nation of people living within a nation without a nationality.

This is without question “The Unspoken Truth”. The words herein are intended to empower by educating people through knowledge concerning issues that many blacks continue to face today from the untreated wounds of America’s forefathers. Let us understand through this knowledge-based examination of the African American Diaspora that I simply offer explanations whereby we can look at and understand the root-cause of the asymptomatic behaviors.

Some people call it a conditioning in “certain” communities while others may call it the Willie Lynch Syndrome. Nonetheless, my view is not an excuse, rather an explanation as to why these behaviors were never unlearned and had been passed down from generation to generation. Over my relatively short lifetime, I have been referred to as Colored, Negro, Afro-American, Black, and an African American, which were the polite terms assigned to make known that people of African Descent were not American citizens.

The concept of African Americans being slaves, physically or mentally, is as old as the nation itself, designed to deprive a people of its culture and knowledge through sustained policies of control. To overcome these indignities, we must realize that education is the single most important ingredient necessary to neutralize the forces that breed poverty and despair. Regardless of how much we are held down, it is our responsibility to find a way to get up, even if the system is designed to protect the system.

We must teach and know that “learning without thought is labor lost; thought without learning is intellectual death, and courage is knowing what’s needed and doing it.” As tenacious beings, we must understand that there is no such thing as an inferior mind. So I say, it’s time for an awakening, if for no other reason than to honor those who sacrificed so much so that we could live life in abundance.

Be brave and remember this: “You only have a minute. Sixty seconds in it. Didn’t choose it, can’t refuse it, it’s up to you to use it. It’s just a tiny little minute but an eternity in it. You can change the world, but first, you must change your mind”. It is time for change and time for a movement! And that is my thought provoking perspective…

Media Kit


Happy Birthday Biggie Smalls

“Excellence is my presence. Never tense, never hesitant.” – Biggie Smalls.

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These are the words left to us by mere mortals like the man whose government name was Christopher Wallace aka Biggie Smalls, also known as Notorious B.I.G. Gone too soon, but his impact will live forever. He was born May 21, 1972, in Bedford–Stuyvesant (colloquially known as Bed-Stuy) neighborhood in the north-central portion of the New York City borough of Brooklyn where some say is city’s roughest borough. There he grew up to become a drug dealer and a hustler, but his legacy was that of a master lyricist.

I have known many artists in my lifetime who have recorded and sold millions of records whereas Mr. Big recorded only three that solidified his place in music history for all-time. He started experimenting with music as a teenager and, not long after, befriended Puffy Combs and with the guidance of Tupac Shakur turned ashy into classy. His 1994 debut album, Ready to Die, was a smash hit and Life After Death became a classic.

Around his neighborhood, Biggie Smalls, as he called himself then, began building a reputation as a musician. After a tape of his landed in the hands of Mister Cee, a well-known DJ, Smalls was featured in the hip-hop publication, The Source.

Almost immediately, the Notorious B.I.G., as he now called himself, appearing on the 1993 remix of Mary J. Blige’s “Real Love,” and followed it up with a second Blige remix, “What’s the 411?” His debut as a solo artist came with the single, “Party and Bullshit,” on the soundtrack to the film, Who’s the Man?

In my view the release of his debut album, Ready to Die, which told the story of his life, from a drug dealer to rapper, was as prophetic as Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On.” With hits like “Juicy” and “Big Poppa,” the record went platinum, and the young hip-hop artist became a full-fledged star. That same year, The Source named the rapper “Best New Artist,”Best Live Performer” and “Lyricist of the Year.”

As his star power increased, Biggie did his best to share his prestige. He backed the work of several rappers that he’d originally performed with while starting out in Brooklyn, and took to the studio in support of other artists on Sean “Puffy” Combs’s label. He also teamed up with such stars as Michael Jackson and R. Kelly. By the close of 1995, Biggie was one of music’s best-selling and most sought after performers.

Big’s success and wealth hardly brought peace to Biggie’s life where he was often quoted as saying “more money more problems.” In the immediate aftermath of Ready to Die’s popularity, the rapper found himself in constant fear. In 1994, he told The New York Times that he was disliked for having more money, which came with his fame.

It was after the murder of Tupac Shakur that amplified Biggie’s fears about his own life, and his concern was tragically validated on March 9, 1997. Biggie, who had just come out of the Soul Train Music Awards, was sitting in an SUV when another vehicle pulled up to his car, opened fire and killed him. His murder shook the music world, prompting fears that the hip-hop world might erupt into a full-fledged war, ending numerous other lives. Biggie was only 24 years old at the time.

In the wake of Big’s killing, the record Life After Death was a giant hit, selling nearly 700,000 copies in its first week. Two years later, Born Again, an album of unreleased material from Biggie, was released. The third album of extra material, Duets: The Final Chapter was released in 2005.

Today, Biggie is still one of the music industry’s most admired hip-hop artists. Several musicians have paid tribute to Biggie by mentioning him in their songs, and his musical style has been emulated by countless up-and-coming artists. There is little doubt that Biggie’s talent, as a writer and rapper, propelled him from a place where so many have been lost and will continue to be acknowledged for decades to come.

If Biggie were alive today, it is safe to say there would be many so-called rapper starving and unknown. Knowing it or not, maybe call it destiny, the Notorious B.I.G. proved there is “Life After Death” and it’s called eternity. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


The Great Bluesman Muddy Waters

5What we know today as Rock and Roll was the creation of a genius from the Mississippi Delta named McKinley Morganfield, better known to the world as Muddy Waters. This bluesman also known as the “father of the modern Chicago Blues” has been credited for being the major inspiration behind the British blues explosion of the 1960s. Muddy’s career resulted in his being ranked No. 17 in Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.

Recent research has uncovered a 1955 interview in the Chicago Defender where he claimed 1915 as his year of birth, which he continued to use in interviews from that point onward. His grandmother is credited with giving the boy she raised the nickname “Muddy” at an early age because he loved to play in the muddy water of nearby Deer Creek. Muddy later changed it to “Muddy Waters.” A testament to his monumental achievements the shack where Muddy lived in his youth on Stovall Plantation is now located at the Delta Blues Museum in Clarksdale, Mississippi.

Although Muddy started out on harmonica but by age seventeen he was playing the guitar at parties, emulating two other blues artists who were extremely popular in the south, Son House and Robert Johnson. However, Muddy would go on to surpass them in stature in terms of changing the face of music.

His influence is tremendous, over a variety of music genres: blues, rhythm and blues, rock and roll, folk, hard rock, jazz and country. It was Muddy who helped Chuck Berry get his first record contract. The Rolling Stones named themselves after his 1950 song “Rollin Stone” and Jimi Hendrix covered one of Muddy’s songs called “Catfish Blues.” Hendrix recalled “the first guitar player I was aware of was Muddy Waters. I first heard him as a little boy, and it scared me to death.”

Cream covered “Rollin and Tumblin” on their 1966 debut album Fresh Cream. Another great Eric Clapton was a big fan of Muddy Waters when he was growing up, and his music influenced Clapton’s musical career. Muddy’s songs were also covered by Canned Heat at the legendary Monterey Pop Festival and later adapted by Bob Dylan on the album Modern Times. Led Zeppelin’s biggest hits, “Whole Lotta Love”, is lyrically based upon the Muddy Waters hit “You Need Love”, written by Willie Dixon.

Dixon wrote some of Muddy Waters’ most famous songs, including “I Just Want to Make Love to You” that became a big radio hit for Etta James as well as the 1970s rock band Forghat. One of Muddy’s biggest hits “Hoochie Coochie Man that The Allman Brothers Band famously covered was big for them and Humble Pie and Steppenwolf as well.

In 1993, Paul Rodgers released the album Muddy Water Blues: A Tribute to Muddy Waters, on which he covered a number of Muddy Waters songs. Including “Louisiana Blues”, “Rollin’ Stone”, “Hoochie Coochie Man” and “I’m Ready” that included a number of famous guitarists such as Gary Moore, Brian May and Jeff Beck.

Muddy Waters’ songs have been featured in long-time fan Matin Scorsese’s movies, including The Color of Money, Goodfellas and Casino. His music was used in Better Off Dead, the hit film Risky Business, and featured in the rockumentary The Last Waltz.

The Beatles referenced Muddy in the song Come Together: “He roller coaster/he got Muddy Waters.” Van Morrison lyrics include “Muddy Waters singin,’ “I’m a Rolling Stone” from his 1982 song “Cleaning Windows”, on the Album Beautiful Vision. Honestly, I could go on and on as long as I have room to write.

What impressed me most about the great Muddy Waters was that he created what every band since has configured musically. It was Mud, as he was sometimes called, who configured his band with a bass guitar, and instruments to enhance his talents.

Although there were many greatest produced out of his era – Muddy Waters lead the way and, dare I say, was the innovator of what the world now knows as Rock ‘n’ Roll. Mud might be best known for his beautiful Cadillac’s, being a lady’s man or as having Little Walter harmonic talents as his gifted sideman. The great Muddy Waters is best-known for changing the world of music and music has never been the same. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

CHESS RECORDS STORY


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