Tag Archives: Malcolm X

Honoring El-HAJJ MALIK SHABAZZ AKA Malcolm X

012_1000Remembering the prophet and revolutionary on the day he was taken from us. Although your message and words are still with us; we miss you and need you now. On February 27, 1965, Ossie Davis gave this moving eulogy at the Faith Temple Church of God in Harlem, NY. Your greatness will never die.

RIP Brother Minister!

Here, at this final hour, in this quiet place, Harlem has come to bid farewell to one of its brightest hopes, extinguished now and gone from us forever. For Harlem is where he worked and where he struggled and fought. His home of homes where his heart was and where his people are. And it is, therefore, most fitting that we meet once again in Harlem to share these last moments with him. For Harlem has ever been gracious to those who loved her, have fought for her and have defended her honor even to the death.

It is not in the memory of man that this beleaguered, unfortunate but nonetheless proud community has found a braver, more gallant young champion than this Afro-American who lies before us, unconquered still. I say the word again, as he would want me to: Afro-American. Afro-American Malcolm, who was a master, was most meticulous in his use of words. Nobody knew better than he the power words have over the minds of men. Malcolm had stopped being a ‘Negro’ year’s ago. It had become too small, too puny, too weak a word for him. Malcolm was bigger than that. Malcolm had become an Afro-American and he wanted so desperately that we, that all his people, would become Afro-Americans, too.

There are those who will consider it their duty, as friends of the Negro people, to tell us to revile him, to flee even, from the presence of his memory, to save ourselves by writing him out of the history of our turbulent times. Many will ask what Harlem finds to honor in this stormy, controversial and bold young captain. And we will smile. Many will say turn away, away from this man, for he is not a man but a demon, a monster, a subverter and an enemy of the black man. And we will smile. They will say that he is of hate, a fanatic, a racist who can only bring evil to the cause for which you struggle! And we will answer and say to them: Did you ever talk to Brother Malcolm? Did you ever touch him, or have him smile at you? Did you ever really listen to him? Did he ever do a mean thing? Was he ever himself associated with violence or any public disturbance? For if you did you would know him. And if you knew him you would know why we must honor him:

Malcolm was our manhood, our living, black manhood! This was his meaning to his people. Consigning these mortal remains to earth, the common mother of all, secure in the knowledge that what we place in the ground is no more now a man but a seed which, after the winter of our discontent, will come forth again to meet us. And we will know him then for what he was and is. A prince; our own black shining prince who didn’t hesitate to die because he loved us so.

And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


Commemorating Malcolm X In His Own Words

226I am one who believes that Malcolm X, also known as El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, was the greatest black man of our time. I was old enough to live and witness Brother Malcolm’s life. Today, everybody loves Malcolm, and rightfully so, but while he lived most people, black people included ran from him and his words like he was a blazing fire. I submit that most don’t know Malcolm or understand the sacrifices he made to open the eyes of his people.

I am proud to say, he was my hero and honored to have been enlightened by him. Therefore, the best way I could honor him on the day of his birth is to share some of the words he spoke, and I hope it will touch the souls of some and open your eyes.

A man who stands for nothing will fall for anything.

You can’t separate peace from freedom because no one can be at peace unless he has his freedom.

Change Is Only a Good Thing If You Change in a Good Way.

You don’t have to be a man to fight for freedom. All you have to do is to be an intelligent human being.

You’re not supposed to be so blind with patriotism that you can’t face reality. Wrong is wrong, no matter who says it.

Nonviolence is fine as long as it works.

I believe in the brotherhood of man, all men, but I don’t believe in brotherhood with anybody who doesn’t want brotherhood with me. I believe in treating people right, but I’m not going to waste my time trying to treat somebody right who doesn’t know how to return the treatment.

Speaking like this doesn’t mean that we’re anti-white, but it does mean we’re anti-exploitation, we’re anti-degradation, we’re anti-oppression.

Without education, you’re not going anywhere in this world.

Usually when people are sad, they don’t do anything. They just cry over their condition. But when they get angry, they bring about a change.

If violence is wrong in America, violence is wrong abroad. If it is wrong to be violent defending black women and black children and black babies and black men, then it is wrong for America to draft us, and make us violent abroad in defense of her. And if it is right for America to draft us, and teach us how to be violent in defense of her, then it is right for you and me to do whatever is necessary to defend our own people right here in this country.

Wrong is wrong, no matter who does it or who says it.

I believe in human beings, and that all human beings should be respected as such, regardless of their color.

Nobody can give you freedom. Nobody can give you equality or justice or anything. If you’re a man, you take it.

I believe in a religion that believes in freedom. Anytime I have to accept a religion that won’t let me fight a battle for my people, I say to hell with that religion.

The only way we’ll get freedom for ourselves is to identify ourselves with every oppressed people in the world. We are blood brothers to the people of Brazil, Venezuela, Haiti, Cuba — yes Cuba too.

You show me a capitalist, and I’ll show you a bloodsucker.

It’s just like when you’ve got some coffee that’s too black, which means it’s too strong. What do you do? You integrate it with cream, you make it weak. But if you pour too much cream in it, you won’t even know you ever had coffee. It used to be hot, it becomes cool. It used to be strong, it becomes weak. It used to wake you up, now it puts you to sleep.

In all our deeds, the proper value and respect for time determines success or failure.

My alma mater was books, a good library. I could spend the rest of my life reading, just satisfying my curiosity.

If you’re not ready to die for it, put the word freedom out of your vocabulary.

We do not condemn the preachers as an individual but we condemn what they teach. We urge that the preachers teach the truth, to teach our people the one important guiding rule of conduct — unity of purpose.

We declare our right on this earth to be a human being, to be respected as a human being, to be given the rights of a human being in this society, on this earth, in this day, which we intend to bring into existence by any means necessary.

When a person places the proper value on freedom, there is nothing under the sun that he will not do to acquire that freedom. Whenever you hear a man saying he wants freedom, but in the next breath he is going to tell you what he won’t do to get it, or what he doesn’t believe in doing in order to get it, he doesn’t believe in freedom. A man who believes in freedom will do anything under the sun to acquire… or preserve his freedom.

Power never takes a step back except in the face of more power.

Sitting at the table doesn’t make you a diner, unless you eat some of what’s on that plate. Being here in America doesn’t make you an American. Being born here in America doesn’t make you an American.

It is impossible for capitalism to survive, primarily because the system of capitalism needs some blood to suck. Capitalism used to be like an eagle, but now it’s more like a vulture. It used to be strong enough to go and suck anybody’s blood whether they were strong or not. But now it has become more cowardly, like the vulture, and it can only suck the blood of the helpless. As the nations of the world free themselves, the capitalism has less victims, less to suck, and it becomes weaker and weaker. It’s only a matter of time in my opinion before it will collapse completely.

Thank you for your life and wisdom. Maybe Brother Malcolm was right to call those people Devils! And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


A Revolutionary Thought From The Past

They call black people lazy but this only occurred after we stopped working for free! We need to unite and seek and take action!


Black History: Dr. John Henrik Clarke

16266194_1576646812351280_7451924563813283492_nJohn Henrik Clarke was one of the most brilliant, profound, and empowering educators of our time. He was born January 1, 1915, in Union Springs, Alabama and died July 16, 1998, in New York City. His mother was a washerwoman who did laundry for $3 a week, and his father was a sharecropper. As a youngster Clark caddied for Dwight Eisenhower and Omar Bradley “long before they became Generals or President,” Clarke would later recount in describing his upbringing in rural Alabama.

Ms. Harris, his third-grade teacher, convinced him that one day he would be a writer, but before he became a writer, he became a voracious reader inspired by Richard Wright’s “Black Boy” about a veteran who enlisted in the army and earned the rank of Master Sergeant. After mustering out, Clarke moved to Harlem and committed himself to a lifelong pursuit of factual knowledge about the history of his people and creative application of that knowledge. Over the years, Clarke became both a major historian and a man of letters.

His literary accomplishments are very significant, but he was best known as a historian. He wrote over two hundred short stories with “The Boy Who Painted Christ Black” being his best known. Clarke edited numerous literary and historical anthologies including American Negro Short Stories (1966), an anthology which included nineteenth century writing from writers such as Paul Laurence Dunbar, Charles Waddell Chestnut, and continued up through the early sixties with writers such as LeRoi Jones (Amiri Baraka) and William Melvin Kelley. This is one of the classic collections of Black fiction.

Reflective of his commitment to his adopted home, Clarke also edited “Harlem, A Community in Transition and Harlem, U.S.A”. Never one to shy away from the difficult or the controversial, Clarke edited anthologies on Malcolm X and a major collection of essays decrying William Styron’s “portrait” of Nat Turner as a conflicted individual who had a love/hate platonic and sexually-fantasized relationship with Whites. In both cases, Clarke’s work was in defense of the dignity and pride of his beloved Black community rather than an attack on Whites.

What is significant is that Clarke did the necessary and tedious organizing work to bring these volumes into existence. Thereby, offering an alternative outlook from the dominant mainstream views on Malcolm X and Nat Turner, both of whom were often characterized as militant hate mongers. Clarke understood the necessity for us to affirm our belief in and respect for radical leaders such as Malcolm X and Nat Turner. It is interesting to note that Clarke’s work was never simply focused on investigating history as the past; he also was proactively involved with history in the making.

As a historian Clarke also edited a book on Marcus Garvey and edited “Africa, Lost and Found” (with Richard Moore and Keith Baird) and “African People at the Crossroads”, two seminal historical works widely used in History and African American Studies disciplines on college and university campuses. Through the United Nations, he published monographs on Paul Robeson and W.E.B. DuBois. As an activist historian, he produced the monograph Christopher Columbus and the African Holocaust. His most recently published book was “Who Betrayed the African Revolution?”

In the form of edited books, monographs, major essays and book introductions, John Henrik Clarke produced well over forty major historical and literary documents. Rarely, if ever, has one man delivered so much quality and inspiring literature. Moreover, John Henrik Clarke was also an inquisitive student who became a master teacher.

During his early years in Harlem, Clarke made the most of the rare opportunities to be mentored by many of the great 20th century Black historians and bibliophiles. Clarke studied under and learned from men such as Arthur Schomburg, William Leo Hansberry, John G. Jackson, Paul Robeson, Willis Huggins and Charles Seiffert. All of whom, sometimes quietly behind the scenes and other times publicly in the national and international spotlight, were significant movers and shakers, theoreticians and shapers of Black intellectual and social life in the 20th century.

From the sixties on, John Henrik Clarke stepped up and delivered the full weight of his own intellectual brilliance and social commitment to the ongoing struggle for Black liberation and development. Clarke became a stalwart member and hard worker in (and sometimes co-founder of) organizations such as The Harlem Writers Guild, Presence Africaine, African Heritage Studies Association, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, the National Council of Black Studies and the Association for the Study of Classical African Civilizations.

Formally, Clarke lectured and held professorships at universities worldwide. His longer and most influential tenures were at the Africana Studies and Research Center at Cornell in Ithaca, New York, and in African and Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College in New York City. He received honorary degrees from numerous institutions and served as consultant and advisor to African and Caribbean heads of state. In 1997, he was the subject of a major documentary directed by the noted filmmaker Saint Claire Bourne and underwritten by the Hollywood star Westley Snipes.

John Henrik Clarke is in many ways exemplary of the American ethos of the self-made man. Indicative of this characteristic is the fact that Clarke changed his given name of John Henry Clark to reflect his aspirations. In an obituary, he penned for himself shortly before his death, John Henrik Clarke noted “little black Alabama boys were not fully licensed to imagine themselves as conduits of social and political change. …they called me ‘Bubba’ and because I had the mind to do so, I decided to add the ‘e’ to the family name ‘Clark’ and change the spelling of ‘Henry’ to ‘Henrik,’ after the Scandinavian rebel playwright, Henrik Ibsen.”

I like his spunk and the social issues he addressed in ‘A Doll’s House.’ …My daddy wanted me to be a farmer; feel the smoothness of Alabama clay and become one of the first blacks in my town to own land. But, I was worried about my history being caked with that southern clay, and I subscribed to a different kind of teaching and learning in my bones and in my spirit.”

Body and soul, John Henrik Clarke was a true champion of Black people. He bequeathed us with a magnificent legacy of accomplishment and inspiration born out of the earnest commitment of one irrepressible young man to make a difference in the daily and historical lives of his black people through knowledge. And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…

Black History is American History
“Just a Season”

Black History: “By Any Means Necessary”

Malcolm X was no doubt one of the most profoundly significant, famous, and controversial African American leaders of our time. I cannot recall any other MAN, except maybe Dr. King, whose impact was so overwhelmingly felt by so many. Minister Malcolm’s prophetic words spoken over forty-five years ago still resonate as relevant today, as the day they were spoken evoking the same emotions of truth.

February 21st marked the day of Minister Malcolm’s assassination at the Audubon Ballroom that has yet to be fully resolved in the minds of most of us. What I can say is that we lost a champion unlike any I’ve witnessed in my lifetime. Therefore, it would be blasphemy to honor him as one of the ghosts of the greats and the most articulate orator of our time.

I could go deeper into the making of this man but so many people, agencies, institutions, and organizations have covered this great man’s brief life on earth in much more detail than I can. As you know, there is a vast sea of in-depth analyzes, books, movies, and biographies on his life and philosophies. I will not try to rewrite history rather simply pay homage to the legacy of this great man, as brief as I can, honoring him for his contributions to the African American Diaspora.

There are facts (known & unknown), suspicions and of course theories surrounding the assassination of Malcolm X, the impact it has had on our culture and the world. Like the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Malcolm X also had a dream. It began bathed in the tenets of anger and hatred, fostering economic independence on the shoulders of retaliatory separatism. However, in the end it was the swelling acceptance of a unified brotherhood and the replacement of hatred with peace and with the nagging thirst for international equality for all mankind.

As the story goes, early in Malcolm’s life a white teacher asked him what he would like to be, and his answer was “a lawyer”. The teacher, who had encouraged his white students on their career choices, told Malcolm, “That’s no realistic goal for a nigger”. This statement discouraged a bright student to not seek his full potential leading to a life of crime. After being caught and arrested for carrying a concealed weapon he was sentenced to prison. While serving more than six years, he began educating himself, converted to the Islamic faith and became a Black Muslim in the Nation of Islam (NOI).

After his release in 1952, Malcolm Little, now known as Malcolm X, went to Detroit and began to preach actively to the frustrated African American population about what Islam had to offer. It made no difference where he conducted his sermons and teachings, whether on the streets or in a temple. He spread the word to anyone who would listen.

It was not long before Malcolm became a favorite of Elijah Muhammad, the leader of the Nation of Islam. He was made a minister and began to travel from city to city, preaching the message, founding new temples and converting thousands of people to the faith. Two years later, Malcolm X became minister of the famed Temple Number Seven in Harlem, New York.

In April of 1964, Malcolm X made a pilgrimage to Mecca which led to his second conversion. He met brothers of the faith who were from many nations and of many races, black, brown, white, and all the sons of Allah. The reality dawned on him that advocating racial cooperation and brotherhood would help resolve the racial problems in America and, hopefully, lead to a peaceful coexistence throughout the world. Malcolm X’s transformed ideas and dreams reached full fruition and were ready for implementation. He changed his name, this time to El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz and found himself going against the system.

It did not take long for the reactionaries to strike out at Malcolm X. Members of the NOI resented what they thought were his attempts to supplant Elijah Muhammad. Government entities feared his involving the NOI in international issues, as well as his starting to lean too far to the left, while law enforcement officials looked upon him and his actions as radical, criminal and detrimental to society.

Early on the morning of February 14, 1965, Malcolm, and his family were peacefully asleep in their home in Elmhurst, New York. They were suddenly awakened by the sounds of shattering glass and explosions. Several Molotov cocktails had been thrown through their living room window, engulfing the house in roaring flames. Malcolm and his wife, Betty, quickly gathered their children and rushed out of the burning house. Once safe, they stood outside in the cold air, watching as their home and possessions burned. It was never determined who had tried to kill them though Malcolm did tell authorities he thought it may have been the NOI.

Just one week later at a scheduled appearance at the Audubon Ballroom, which was almost full on a cold February day with over 400 followers of Islam anxiously awaiting Brother Malcolm X. No uniformed police were visible inside the Audubon, but two were stationed outside the entrance although it was common knowledge that an attempt on Malcolm’s life was a real possibility. Inside the Audubon Ballroom, several dark-suited NOI guards were positioned near the stage and towards the rear of the room. As soldiers of the NOI, the militancy of the neatly dressed men was evident in their demeanor, as they surveyed the room, quietly watching the seating of late arrivals.

Malcolm X, his pregnant wife and their four children waited as a tense and nervous Malcolm X ordered two of his guards to take his family out into the hall to their seats in a box near the front of the stage. Seemingly irritated and exhausted, Malcolm X mentioned to his aides that he had reservations about speaking. Malcolm’s misgivings were reflected in his taut features as his restless eyes darted around the room as he listened to Brother Benjamin Goodman making his opening speech.

At approximately 3:08 pm, Brother Benjamin ended his speech and introduced Malcolm X, who walked out onto the stage to a lengthy ovation. Malcolm stepped up to a wooden podium and looked out at the audience. When the applause finally settled down, he offered the audience the Muslim greeting and smiled when they responded in-kind. Just as he began to speak again, a commotion broke out near the rear of the ballroom.

Two men jumped up, knocking wooden folding chairs to the floor, as one of the men yelled, “Get your hand out of my pocket!” As Malcolm responded with cool it their brothers, a loud explosion suddenly erupted in the back of the room, which began to fill with smoke.

Malcolm’s bodyguards and aides hardly had time to react as the well coordinated ruses effectively diverted their attention from him, allowing unopposed gunmen to begin their attack. A man rose from the front row and pulled out a sawed-off double-barreled shotgun from under his coat and fired twice at Malcolm. Simultaneously, as Malcolm was falling backward and clutching his bloody chest, two more men jumped up and fired pistols at him as they rushed the stage. Although Malcolm was down, the two men repeatedly fired bullets into his body before turning and running to flee the premises. More shots were fired as they ran.

Upon learning of the assassination of Malcolm X, the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. remarked; “One has to conquer the fear of death if he is going to do anything constructive in life and take a stand against evil”. We may never know all of the facts about who was behind the assassination or who ordered his death. But we do know that these assassins denied him the chance to act upon his newly formed convictions.

Today, the man and the name, Malcolm X, are known in America and throughout the world. He was a celebrated freedom fighter and motivating force to those whose future he had the vision to see, the will to stand up and fight for. Postage stamps and posters now bear his image out of recognition and honor for his final crusade.

The eulogy that actor Ossie Davis delivered at his funeral profoundly impresses upon us that, “However we may have differed with him, or with each other about him and his value as a man, let his going from us serve only to bring us together, now. Consigning these mortal remains to earth, the common mother of all, secure in the knowledge that what we place in the ground is no more now a man but a seed which, after the winter of our discontent, will come forth again to meet us. And we will know him then for what he was and is a Prince, our own black shining Prince! Who didn’t hesitate to die, because he loved us so.”

Malcolm X was a man who fulfilled his place in history and stayed true to his words: “It is a time for martyrs now, and if I am to be one, it will be for the cause of brotherhood.” And That’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…

A collection of Malcolm X Speeches

“Just a Season”

AMAZON


As Spoken By The King

200x200In light of the horrible state of race relations in America today. We see many murders at the hands of the law, the unequal justice, the corrupt penal system that has become nothing more than the 21st century’s version of slavery, and the unfair economic challenges imposed upon black people in America. Black people have a right to be angry when they are blamed for their current conditions as if slavery, Jim Crow laws, “black codes” and the historical legacy of mistreatment by the system of white supremacy that has had a long-term and devastating effects on the Black community.

Dr. King was a shining example of bravery and left us with some powerful words before his death that we should recall today in these trying times where racism has boldly reared its ugly head. White Supremacy main purpose is to subjugate, use, and to eliminate people of color, which is to be for the benefit of white people.

Dr. King understood this which explains why most of has words have been sanitized, removed or reduced primarily to “I have a dream”. However, as I look at the state of black America today, this dream was more like a nightmare.

Here are some quotes “they” would never tell you about:

“I knew that I could never again raise my voice against the violence of the oppressed in the ghettos without having first spoken clearly to the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today – my own government.”

“There is a magnificent new militancy within the Negro community all across this nation. And I welcome this as a marvelous development. The Negro of America is saying he’s determined to be free and he is militant enough to stand up.”

“You can’t talk about solving the economic problem of the Negro without talking about billions of dollars. You can’t talk about ending the slums without first saying profit must be taken out of the slums. You’re really tampering and getting on dangerous ground because you are messing with folk then. You are messing with captains of industry. Now this means that we are treading in difficult water, because it really means that we are saying that something is wrong with capitalism.”

“It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked ‘insufficient funds.’”

“We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed. Frankly I have never yet engaged in a direct action movement that was ‘well timed,’ according to the timetable of those who have not suffered unduly from the disease of segregation. For years now I have heard the word ‘Wait!’ It rings in the ear of every Negro with a piercing familiarity. This ‘wait’ has almost always meant ‘never.’ We must come to see with the distinguished jurist of yesterday that ‘justice too long delayed is justice denied.’”

“The question is not whether we will be extremists, but what kind of extremists will we be? Will we be extremists for hate or for love? Will we be extremists for the preservation of injustice or the extension of justice?”

“If America does not use her vast resources of wealth to end poverty and make it possible for all of God’s children to have the basic necessities of life, she too will go to hell.”

“The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.”

“If our economic system is to survive, there has to be a better distribution of wealth … we can’t have a system where some people live in superfluous, inordinate wealth, while others live in abject deadening poverty.”

“The hope of a secure and livable world lies with disciplined nonconformists, who are dedicated to justice, peace and brotherhood. The trailblazers in human, academic, scientific and religious freedom have always been nonconformists. In any cause that concerns the progress of mankind, put your faith in the nonconformist!”

“Somebody told a lie one day. They couched it in language. They made everything Black ugly and evil. Look in your dictionaries and see the synonyms of the word Black. It’s always something degrading and low and sinister. Look at the word White, it’s always something pure, high and clean. Well I want to get the language right tonight. I want to get the language so right that everyone here will cry out: ‘Yes, I’m Black, I’m proud of it. I’m Black and I’m beautiful!’”

“Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.”

“I must confess that over the past few years I have been gravely disappointed with the white moderate. I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro’s great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen’s Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who is more devoted to ‘order’ than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: ‘I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action’; who paternalistically believes he can set the timetable for another man’s freedom; who lives by a mythical concept of time and who constantly advises the Negro to wait for a ‘more convenient season.’”

“Society’s punishments are small compared to the wounds we inflict on our soul when we look the other way.”

“No one really knows why they are alive until they know what they’d die for.

Dr. King taught us a powerful lesson, which was the only way black problem could be solve was to boycott and starve the system through economics. If ever there was a time to wake up that time is now! And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

 


The Truth Is: It’s All Lies

3The way white folk tell the story of history it always makes him the hero, which is why it’s called His-Story. The truth of the matter is that very little of what he told is true! We can start with Columbus who was the original robber and murderer! Then we can ask the native people of America how they were treated. When it comes to Black people history is clear the crimes inflicted upon this race. But they say that “all men are created equal”. This was the biggest lie ever told!

Minister Malcolm asked a profound question before he was taken from us. Having seen racism, known Jim Crow and witnessed segregation I’ve pondered and sought the answer to a question brother Malcolm asked and I presume most black people have done as well; “How can so few rule so many?”

After I became a man, I learned the answer was right before my eyes in the place where all the lies are buried – the LIBRARY. Perhaps, this is the reason black people were killed for learning how to read. These people knew if the oppressed could read they would learn everything told and taught to them in terms of history was a lie, which means the actual truth was never told and one of amoral behavior and pure evil perpetrated in the name of God.

The story of the conquerors begins with a criminal who got lost and stumbled upon an island he called the new world, never reaching the shores of America but given credit for discovering it. Upon his arrival, he raped, murdered, and pillaged becoming their hero. Others followed with the same criminal intent to take the land where people resided and all the resources claiming under the guise of “Manifest Destiny,” which means God himself, said they were entitled to it.

They told us how they were welcomed with a story of Thanksgiving where the people helped them survive only to be slaughtered. The same thing occurred in a place called Jamestown, where again they received help from the inhabitants during a time called “the starving times”; their gratitude was stealing the land and annihilating the people who helped them survive.

The country was taken officially with acts of terror and revolution in the name of “Liberty for all” and something called a Constitution. To this point, they had already, for a half a century, used the enslavement of human beings taken from Africa to build wealth and a nation. To cement their supremacy, this document said, the people of African descent they claimed were not human to justify the abuse. Further, to justify this, they said these human beings were nothing more than chattel property – merely a beast of burden used for prosperity.

They convince the African people after being reduced to lifelong servitude to celebrate the Fourth of July and the liberty it granted, albeit only for them. It is important to note, shortly after the stolen nation was formed, the first law passed was the “Naturalization Act of 1790,” which said that “only free white people can be citizens of this country”. For the purpose of understanding, when you hear the coded phrase “we want our country back” speaks directly to this law meaning for white people, who they call the real Americans!

Then it was the most brutal act of their conscience, which was having the slave fight a war against itself, the Civil War, to see who would have the right to benefit from black people being slaves. More whites died in this conflict than in any of America’s wars. Ironically, they called it a “Civil War”. Frankly, there is nothing civil about this type of insanity. In the end, they told the Colored’s they were free, and Lincoln emaciated them. In fact, Lincoln never emaciated anyone. A precursor to the war was a significant Supreme Court ruling in the case of Dred Scott, who challenged the government for his freedom. The court ruled, “There are no rights a Negro has that a white man is bound to respect”.

What followed was something called Reconstruction. This was not successful by design and racism reared its ugly head more viciously ushering in a new system of control – Separate but Equal leading to segregation and Jim Crow, which was nothing more than Apartheid. Of course, even in modern times when there is news footage of the horrors of racism; lynching’s, brutal attacks, fire hoses, or death. Most white people ignore it as if somehow the abused black people were at fault.

As I close with this shameful summation, let me say that it was the use of religion and a marvelous story, mostly myth, used as a cover for the ungodly acts to support these dreadful horrors against mankind. To that point, no one knows what Jesus actually looked liked but the picture representing him looks like Massa with blonde hair and blue eyes. It was also the Massa who taught and gave knowledge of this religion to the slave, which has enslaved trillions of minds to this very day. Therefore, laws were created by white people for white people to be used as a weapon against black people and have been detrimental since the slave-holding so-called forefathers who designed it that way.

In short, we are taught a feel-good Disney-style version of history to promote patriotism and the Willie Lynch Syndrome to continue racism. Both combined results continued wealth for a few, which is why so few can rule so many. He who has the gold, therefore, makes the rules. Therefore, the only way to make a change is to choose not to spend your money with those who oppress you!

Minister Malcolm also said of America’s dirt “The chickens come home to roost”! And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


The Sad State Of Being Brainwashed

FotoFlexer_AnimationThis message is to those whose minds that are brainwashed, blind, and those who can’t see. Truth is most of you sit in some church praying to white Jesus not realizing that black people have prayed far too long. I wonder how do you looked at yourself in the mirror, as you prepared to look pretty for the pimp in the pulpit.

They murder some unarmed black person at least once a week and what do you do; pray or make a little noise for a day or so, and move on. I know you will say something foolish like “God is Good”! So I ask what is good? You will say that you love God; whom you cannot see, but you do not or cannot love your man or your brother, a black man that you can see. I know you are thinking shame on me. Well I will take that criticism but truth is real!

Today I felt the need to express harshly my disdain for the way black people respond to and represent themselves in the midst of their annihilation. Think about this, you don’t love yourself, so how can you expect anyone else to love you. Case in point, a great man, Dr. King, died for you trying to gain equality and civil rights for the Negro of his day and all black people, and what do you do; talk about what Hoover said, he was supposed to have cheated on his wife. The man died with only a few suits and no money!

Malcolm, the greatest truth-teller in black history, was killed for you and what did you do; you watch as his descendants were put through hell. Most of you were afraid to say his name while he was alive, let alone followed him, nor did you help his family after he was killed. You watched as they killed his wife and grandson. Most of you watched as they set up one of his children and what did you your do; gossiped and believed what the white media told you. But you will give your last dime to some clown who asked you to buy him a new airplane.

I can go down the long list of casualties and victims laid waste by the COINTEL program that targeted the brave soldiers fighting for your freedom. Malcolm said, you have been hoodwinked, and I agree. They murdered nine black people in a horrible act of terror in a church and what do you do; forgave the killer the next day for killing these people.

Most of you, particularly black women, will sit or sat in some church this morning praising white Jesus or a pimp in the pulpit, while this clown is living very well at your expense. You do this every Sunday and in some cases days in between. The definition of insanity is to do the samething over and over while you get no results. So you give unto him while you can’t pay your bills or behind in them, while children and family go without!

A few weeks ago, one hundred so-called pastors met with Trump, which was the most disgusting spectacle I’ve EVER witnessed to get their thirty pieces of silver. Damn black people, when are you going to wake up. It has been four hundred years since they stole your religion and imposed a fantastical story, an all white story, taken from African spirituality and made it their own. Then gave it to you and you believe wholeheartedly every word of that untruth. They rewrote what started as truth, and expounded upon it 28 times to suit their agenda, which was to brainwash and maintain their embedded principle of white supremacy.

Of course, the world is in distress, your genocide is the agenda, and it looks like there is no hope but that has always been the case in the lives of black people, since the African was dragged onto these shores. In fact, since the European arrived in Africa! They put our ancestors on a ship named the Good Ship Jesus, raped, pillaged and murder black people in the most ungodly ways the world has ever seen. Yet, you believe those people of the other hue will save you!

I will say this with certainty; our ancestors who lived through the horrors of slavery, the degradation of Jim Crow, and the terror inflicted upon black people today and you do nothing are ashamed of you and the condition of black people.

I am well aware that these words will produce odious comments and I will be told that I am going to hell. But before you comment, know that I will accept that fate because hell can’t be worse than the horror and terror both you and I are living in this life under white supremacy on this earth! Wake up!!! And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


Words Of Wisdom

I am a proud member of the common sense party. Neither of the other mainstream parties have done anything for black people nor has the larger white community – ever and got sense enough to it. This year’s election for president is merely a choice between evil and less evil. The woman candidate has hoodwinked black folk and the others by saying she will be the first woman president and the other guy might do to us as Hitler did to the Jews.

I have seen this game enough to know it does not matter who is chosen that black people will get not more than what they had and never got. America has never been great for black people, it has been a nightmare! These two great men sums up what history has shown. List to Malcolm:

Now listen the master teacher Dr. John Henrik Clarke:

And that’s is my thought provoking perspective…


Malcolm X Assassinated At The Audubon Ballroom In 1965

773_160Malcolm X, Black Nationalist leader and civil rights activists, is killed as he was about to address his followers. This happened a week after his Queens home was firebombed.

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS Archives
Tuesday, February 17, 2015, 10:03 AM
Exported.;

Malcolm X is removed on stretcher from Audubon Ballroom.

(Originally published by the Daily News on Feb. 22, 1965. This story was written by John Mallon, Henry Machirella and Leeds Moberley.)

A week after he was fire-bombed out of his Queens home, Black Nationalist leader Malcolm X was shot to death shortly after 3 P.M. yesterday as he started to address a Washington Heights rally of some 400 of his devoted followers.

Three other men were wounded in the wild burst of firing from at least three weapons – a .38 and a .45 automatic pistol and a sawed-off shotgun – although only the shotgun was recovered. One of the wounded was identified by witnesses as one of the killers, but the role of the others was not clear. Nor was it established how any of them got their wounds.

Police believed the murder detail consisted of at least five men, and every available witness was being questioned last night at the Wadsworth Ave. station.

Malcolm’s followers were quick to accuse the Black Muslims, whom he had blamed for the bombing of his home. Half a dozen of his bodyguards were reported last night to be en route to Chicago to wreak vengeance on Elijah Muhammad, leader of the Black Muslims. Police were unable to confirm the report but an alert was out.

Denies That Black Muslims Are Responsible

Elijah’s New York spokesman, James X, denied the Black Muslims were responsible for the bombing.

Malcolm’s wife, Betty Shabazz, said last night at a brief press conference in George’s Nightspot, 103-04 Astoria Blvd., East Elmhurst, Queens, that her husband “knew he would be killed some day.” But she only shook her head when newsmen asked who the killers were. She also said that although she was present when the assassins struck, she did not see the shooting – which contradicted earlier reports.

Meanwhile, as a precaution against possible clashes between the Muslims and Malcolm’s Afro-American Union – which he set up when he broke with the Muslims last year – the police asked the Muslims to close their Harlem mosques last night, including Mosque No. 7 at 102 W. 116th St., where Malcolm used to be the head man. The Muslims complied.

Scene of the assassination was the Audubon Ballroom at 166th St. and Broadway. An introductory speaker who immediately preceded Malcolm on the rostrum had just told the faithful:

“Malcolm is a man who would give his life for you. There aren’t many men who would lay down their lives for you.”

Then Malcolm stepped forward to a thunderous ovation. When the cheering died out, he spoke three words – “Brothers and Sisters” – and got no further.

Scuffle Breaks Out At Back of Hall

NEW YORK DAILY NEWSEnlarge
New York Daily News published this on Feb. 22, 1965.
New York Daily News published this on Feb. 22, 1965.

Witnesses reported that a scuffle, apparently a diversionary maneuver, broke out in the back of the hall, and at the same time, two men, both about 5 feet 6, arose in the audience and moved briskly down the aisle toward the stage. Then a third man came running after them.

“Just a minute, brother,” Malcolm said, and the next instant the place was pandemonium. A phalanx of bodyguards was ranged in front of their leader, facing the audience, but they had no time to intercept the gunman. The men opened fire from a distance of about eight feet; the terrified faithful dropped to the floor as bullets whizzed and ricocheted, and Malcolm X fell mortally wounded.

When the shooting stopped and the men started out, the crowd, went into action. Police arrived just in time to rescue them from a howling mob of about 150 who caught them as they reached the street and, amid screams of “Kill them! Kill them!” were punching and pummeling them unmercifully.

Malcolm, a 39-year-old 6-footer with a slim athletic build, was wheeled on a stretcher bed to the Vanderbilt Clinic of Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, 200 feet away, but attempts to revive him were futile and he was pronounced dead at 3:30 P.M.

A hospital spokesman, reporting that Malcolm had been shot several times in the chest and face, said he was “medically dead” when he reached the clinic’s third-floor emergency room.

Because of expected heightened tension between the warring Black Nationalist groups – Malcolm X’s Organization of Afro-American Unity and Elijah Muhammad’s Chicago-based Black Muslims – Police Commissioner Murphy ordered extra police and mobile units into the area.

A FEB. 21, 1965 FILE PHOTO RELEASED BY WCBS-TV. MANDATORY CREDIT. BEST AVAILABLE QUALITY.WCBS-TV NEWS PHOTO VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS/AP

Thomas Hagan, 22, struggles with police who take him from the scene outside the ballroom where Malcolm X was shot and killed in New York. Hagan, was one of three gunmen who shot Malcolm X as he began a speech at Harlem’s Audubon Ballroom.

Ever since Malcolm X defected from the Black Muslims a year ago, he has been charging the Muslims with plotting to kill him.

A week ago yesterday, when he and his family were fire-bombed out of the East Elmhurst house, he intimated the job was done by the Black Muslims.

The Black Muslims said Malcolm X had done the bombing himself in a grab for publicity.

Moments before the shooting two radio patrolmen were talking outside the hall of a sergeant. Moments after the shots rang out from the hall, the doors burst open, the policemen said, and two dozen screaming persons emerged, on the heels of two men. The mob screamed, “Kill them, don’t let them get away.”

The two men, [African-Americans], were overtaken by the shouting mob. Both were taking a beating when the cops moved in and rescued them. The men were put into a police car and rushed from the scene.

Alarm Sent Out For 1963 Oldsmobile

EXP;AP

Malcolm X lies mortally wounded on the stage of the Audubon Ballroom after his assassin struck. His followers try to comfort him. Autopsy revealed that he died from shotgun wounds to the heart.

The shots and shouts also were heard by Sgt. Alvin Aranoff and Patrolman Louis Angelos, both of the W. 152d St. precinct, who were driving by.

They saw that the mob, which had now swelled to more than 100, was beating and stomping a third man, later identified as Thomas Hagan, 22, who had a bullet wound in the leg.

The crowd was shouting, “Kill him, kill him. He’s the one who shot Malcolm.”

As the cops tried to rescue Hagan, the mob turned on them. Aranoff backed them off by firing a shot in the air, then he and the patrolman whisked the wounded man to the Wadsworth St. station house.

The suspect would say nothing other than to give his name and age. Who had shot him and whether he was one of Malcolm’s followers or one of the assassins could not be learned. A loaded .45 clip and $30 were found in his pockets.

He was taken to Jewish Memorial Hospital, at 196th St. and Broadway, where each of two persons who witnessed the shooting said, when asked if Hagan was the killer, “I think he is.”

;37318ANONYMOUS/AP

Followers tend to Malcolm X as he lies mortally wounded on the stage of the Audubon Ballroom in Harlem after being shot on Feb. 21, 1965.

Hagan later was transferred to the Bellevue Hospital prison ward.

The other two men rescued by the cops were taken to Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital, where they were identified as Willie Harris, and William Parker, of 23-05 30th Ave., Astoria, Queens.

A short time after the shooting, police sent out an alarm for a 1963 blue Oldsmobile with license number-1 G 2220. It was learned the car was registered in the name of Muslim Mosque, 23-11 97th St. East Elmhurst.

The address is that of the house where Malcolm X and his family were routed from their beds by Molotov cocktails last week. In the past week Malcolm X had moved out after being ordered evicted. The house had been a subject of dispute between the rival black nationalist groups since Malcolm X defected from the Muslims.

After the hail of bullets, Malcolm X was placed on a stretcher. A rolling bed was brought from Columbia-Presbyterian and he was wheeled 200 yards diagonally across Broadway to the emergency room.

Wife is Hysterical: Photographers Threatened

This is the Audubon ballroom in upper Harlem, New York, after it was roped off by police following the assassination of Malcolm X, February 21, 1965. The civil rights leader was standing at the podium on stage in the background.AL BURLEIGH/ASSOCIATED PRESS

This is the Audubon ballroom in upper Harlem, New York, after it was roped off by police following the assassination of Malcolm X, February 21, 1965. The civil rights leader was standing at the podium on stage in the background.

He was followed by his weeping hysterical wife and a group of his closest followers. When photographers sought to take pictures of Mrs. Malcolm X, the Black Nationalists moved toward the lensmen and yelled, “Put them down.”

Mrs. Malcolm X and a small group got into Malcolm’s white Dodge and drove to the hospital. They were there when the pronouncement came that Malcolm X was dead.

The body later was transferred to the City Morgue.

Malcolm X’s lawyer, Assemblyman Percy Sutton, said Malcolm X’s wife – whom he referred to as Sister Betty – had reported that her husband’s car and briefcase were missing. It was not known from where they disappeared.

The wife, he said, was staying with friends in Queens. He described Malcolm X as “practically destitute” and uninsured.

Deputy Detective Inspector Thomas Renaghan, in charge of the Sixth Division, said that Malcolm was shot at close range with both .45 and .38 pistols.

This is an exterior view of the Audubon Ballroom on 166th Street at Broadway in the Harlem section of Manhattan, where black Muslim leader Malcolm X was assassinated as he addressed a rally on Feb. 21, 1965.ANONYMOUS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

This is an exterior view of the Audubon Ballroom on 166th Street at Broadway in the Harlem section of Manhattan, where black Muslim leader Malcolm X was assassinated as he addressed a rally on Feb. 21, 1965.

Immediately after the shots were fired at Malcolm, someone dashed up the center aisle, firing additional shots. Police said they were not able to determine immediately whether that person was an assailant or a follower of Malcolm chasing the assassins.

A spent bullet was found in the hallway leading to the street.

Four Guards Standing Just Below Platform

Police said that four of Malcolm’s guards were standing just below the platform when he was hit. They were among the two dozen screaming persons who chased the attackers into the street and started tearing them apart.

Describing the scene, Acting Chief Inspector Harry Taylor of Manhattan North, said, “He had just walked up to the stage, raised his hand in Muslim greeting and said: ‘Salaam, Aleikem.’ (Peace be with you.) There was scuffling in the ballroom.” The shooting followed.

Police found a sawed-off shotgun behind the stage of the ballroom. Both the stock and barrel had been shortened. The weapon was wrapped in a man’s dark gray jacket. It was not known whether the shogun had been used in the shooting.

Exported.;BUCKLEY, ARTHUR

Malcolm X’s widow Betty Shabazz leaves morgue with attorney Percy Sutton and undertaker Joseph Hall after identifying husband’s body.

Commenting on the fatal gunning of the Black Nationalist leader, Sanford Garelick, assistant chief police inspector in charge of the Central Office of Bureaus and Squads, said:

“This is the result, it would seem, of a long-standing feud between the followers of Elijah Muhammad, head of the Black Muslims, and the people who broke away from him, headed by Malcolm X.”

Seeking Shelter From Assailants

The Malcolm X feared for his life was evident in his actions of Saturday. Apparently seeking to hide from any assailants, he checked into the New York Hilton shortly after 4 P.M. He was accompanied by two [African-American] men.

Taking the $18-a-day Room 1206, he registered as M. Shabazz, of 2090 Seventh Ave., which is the address of Harlem’s Hotel Theresa. He said he would stay at the Hilton for two days.

At 10 P.M. three [African-American] men showed up in the lobby and started to question a bellhop about Malcolm X’s whereabouts.

Receiving no information, they stayed around for an hour. The bellhop alerted the hotel’s security men, and the three were closely watched until they left.

At 7 A.M. yesterday [African-American] employees arriving at the hotel were questioned about the location of Malcolm X’s room by a [African-American] man. The questioner got no information.


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