Tag Archives: Mis-Education of the Negro

EDUCATION: The Real Civil Rights Issue

How do we prepare black children to be prepared to enter into a democracy that is driven by capitalism driven by racism? Before I continue, let me say clearly, that “Knowledge is power and power produces an understanding that education is the single most important ingredient necessary to neutralize those forces that breed poverty and despair.” This does not occur in our society as evidenced by the zip code of the student.

Since Brown v Board states have taken enormous steps to defer the education of black students. Whites have moved out to what is little more than segregated communities to establish separate but unequal schools. We have seen that No Child Left Behind does not work. Monies are stripped from budgets because of the insane war efforts and the military industrial complex. Let’s not forget we spend billion on the dream of space travel. So what is the answer?

They say Charter Schools and the privatization of schools systems – really! These options, in my opinion, are not the answer because there is little control or oversight by the educational system authority in most cases. The result is no accountability and corruption by its management. Hence, the student suffers! Let me go back to the issue of segregation – did you know that New York City public schools are the most segregated schools in the country followed by Dallas and Chicago. Shocking!!!

I am not going to dissect this issue now because I am researching for a future writing as I want to have statistics to support my contention, as I know I will be challenged. However, I have put forth what I hope is enough for some to dialog and hopefully take an interest. Every city in America has cut BILLIONs of dollars from the state’s education budget which will result in the loss of teachers. College education is becoming so expensive that most cannot endure the financial hardship.

Malcolm said, which is true, “Only a fool lets his enemy teach his children.” Fact is the education system is still “separate and unequal.” What I think this system does, I’ll call the state of miseducation that creates little more than boot camps for the other privatized entity call the PENITENTIARY!!! And that is my Thought Provoking Perspective…

http://johntwills.com

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/32545640

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy


The Mis-Educated Negro

nothing changes

Sometimes I ask myself, if I have been here before because of how I see things, usually from a different perspective than most. My conclusion is that “history” repeats itself, so there is nothing new under the sun. however, if by chance I have been here before in a past lives I am sure it was as a man of African descent and had something to do with make the great history we achieved. This would give me the authority to compare and contrast a nation of people living in a nation without nationality.

For this reason, I believe without question every black person – young and old – should be required to read the most profound novel ever written on the African American Diaspora – “The Mis-Education of the Negro”. Yes, mandatory reading! This novel contained powerful messages revealed within its pages. Especially when you consider this great work was originally published in 1933 by Dr. Carter G. Woodson, who is known as and considered the father of Black History Month.

Today, I am struck by the fact that we have not understood the potent message left for us. The thesis of Dr. Woodson’s book is that Negroes of his day were being culturally indoctrinated rather than taught in American schools; actually, not even given the advantage of education. This conditioning, he claims, causes African Americans to become dependent, seeking out inferior places in the greater society of which they are a part. This assertion is clearly evident – nearly eighty years later.

He challenged his readers to become empowered by doing for themselves, regardless of what they were taught: “History shows that it does not matter who is in power… those who have not learned to do for themselves and have to depend solely on others never obtain any more rights or privileges in the end than they did in the beginning.”

Today with all the advantages concerning educational opportunities, business exposure, social networking, and a president who looks like us; we are in the best position to succeed than at any time in our history. So the obvious question is “why are we not?” Every other ethnic community takes advantage of their options to strengthen and empower their communities while, sadly, robbing our communities in the process. We will let anybody set up shop in our communities and take our money.

My point is: We must learn to do business with each other in order to gain wealth by keeping our money in our communities. Some say we spend trillions annually, and nearly all of it leaves our community within 15 minutes. Let me remind you that the definition of insanity is to continue to do the same things and expect different results. We can change the world, but first we must change ourselves.

Here is a quote from the “The Mis-Education of the Negro”:

“When you control a man’s thinking you do not have to worry about his actions. You do not have to tell him not to stand here or go yonder. He will find his ‘proper place’ and will stay in it. You do not need to send him to the back door. He will go without being told. In fact, if there is no back door, he will cut one for his special benefit.”

It is time to build upon what was left for us or more importantly “know where you came from to know where you’re going if we are ever going to get there.” And that is my Thought Provoking Perspective!


Under Cover Of Law

1The recent headlines in the news of police brutality, police killings, the police in gas masks and military garb attacking American citizens protesting peacefully shocked some, but frankly this story is as old as America itself. It is the same story of implicit bias, black pain, disenfranchised communities and systemic racism. What this means is that most have forgotten true history and the rest think that the cries and pain of black people are fictitious. Nothing to see here!

Eighteen-year-old Michael Brown was killed by a police officer when he was stopped for walking in the middle of the street. Witnesses say Brown put his hands up and said “Don’t shoot” to the officer as he dumped more than a dozen rounds into his body. The police, however, have remained quiet on Wilson’s version of events, choosing instead to make the victim the focus by releasing grainy video footage of the teen allegedly robbing a store keeper over a pack of pilfered cigars. This is a familiar theme portrayed in the name of justice; blaming of the victim in nearly every such situation at the hands of the law.

This summer there has been weekly brutality by the police and several murders under cover of law. Yet, they ask why such community outrage. For example, the mayor and police chief of tiny Ferguson say there is no problem here – our darkies are happy and love living here. We’ve heard this before as far back as slavery and segregation! In other words, it is just contempt and how they devalued the lives of its black citizens. Instead of trust and healing, the streets of Ferguson were full of tear gas and militarized police. In the place of justice, there is only anger, reminiscent of scenes we have seen before.

Judith Browne Dianis, a veteran civil rights attorney, put it this way:

“Fifty-nine years ago last week, 14-year-old Emmett Till was murdered for allegedly “whistling” at a white woman. His death and open-casket funeral revealing the boy’s brutalized body caused a national outcry, demonstrating how African Americans were viewed as less than human in many parts of our society, and that those who kill them would likely go unpunished. But the killings of Emmett Till and those like him, for infractions small or imagined, didn’t start 59 years ago. These killings and the divide they illustrate are rooted in 400 years of oppression.

In her article, she added and said, “Michael Brown is now part of a tragic legacy, a member of a group that includes Till. You’ll also find Trayvon Martin there, killed last year by a self-appointed neighborhood watchman who stalked him as he walked home. You’ll find New Yorker Eric Garner, choked to death by police last month for asking why he was being harassed. There’s John Crawford, killed by police the same week as Brown for holding an air rifle — essentially a toy gun — in an Ohio Wal-Mart. Ezell Ford’s death this month either came from resisting arrest or lying face down in the street, depending on whether you believe the Los Angeles police or Ford’s mother.

A 2012 study revealed that police officers, security guards, or self-appointed vigilantes extra-judicially killed at least 313 African Americans that year alone. This means a black person was killed at the hands of a “security” officer every 28 hours. But these dire fates are not inevitable. They are the result of generations of suppression and inequality, devaluing the lives of African Americans to the point where we invest little in economic equality, education and the other types of policies that create opportunity in other parts of America.”

The police are paid to protect and serve all people, yet for too many communities of color, police are an occupying force using suppression-only tactics, indicting residents by the color of their skin, not differentiating between them and the criminal element they seek. The police domination of black communities reminds me of Hitler’s Gestapo and storm troopers that occupy not protect and serve.

The question before us is whether or not we will continue to accept this brutal oppression? Four hundred years of this has lasted far too long, and it’s time to say enough is enough! And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

Dick Gregory Speaks


The Mis-Educated Negro

22I once taught a college course where “The Mis-Education of the Negro” was the required class text. It was an amazing experience because I realized that the message remains relevant today. This great work was originally published in 1933 by Dr. Carter G. Woodson, known as the father of BLACK HISTORY MONTH. I feel this book should be mandatory reading for all African America’s – young and old.

As the class read the assigned chapters and we discussed them I was struck by the fact that we have not understood the powerful message contained within its pages. The thesis of Dr. Woodson’s book is that Negro’s of his day were being culturally indoctrinated, rather than taught, in American schools or not taking advantage of education period. This conditioning, he claims, causes African Americans to become dependent and to seek out inferior places in the greater society of which they are a part. This assertion is clearly evident nearly eighty-years later.

He challenged his readers to become empowered by doing for themselves, regardless of what they were taught: “History shows that it does not matter who is in power… those who have not learned to do for themselves and have to depend solely on others never obtain any more rights or privileges in the end than they did in the beginning.”

Today with all the advantages concerning educational opportunities, business exposure, and social networking we are in the best position to succeed than at any time in our history. So the question is “why are we not networking and doing business with each other?” Every other ethnic community takes advantage these options to strengthen and empower themselves – while robbing our communities in the process. We will let anybody setup shop in our communities and take our money.

My point is: we must learn to do business with each other in order to gain wealth by keeping the money in our community. Some say; we spend TRILLION’S annually, and nearly all of it leaves our community within 15 minutes. Let me remind you that the definition of insanity is to continue to do the same thing and expect a different result. We can change the world but first we must change ourselves.

Here is a quote from the “The Mis-Education of the Negro”:

“When you control a man’s thinking you do not have to worry about his actions. You do not have to tell him not to stand here or go yonder. He will find his ‘proper place’ and will stay in it. You do not need to send him to the back door. He will go without being told. In fact, if there is no back door, he will cut one for his special benefit. His education makes it necessary.”

To the many who have read my blog know that I believe education is the single most important ingredient necessary to neutralize those forces that breed poverty and despair. So I say it’s time to know where you came from to know where you’re going, if we are ever going to get there. And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…

http://johntwills.com


That Literary Lady Talks With Author John T. Wills

41475_1273248444_3897_nAuthor John T. Wills sat down with Yolanda Bryant-Johnson “That Literary Lady” for a rare interview. An honor indeed. I invite you to listen and get to know the author of Thought Provoking Perspectives.

http://johntwills.com

“Knowledge is power and power produces an understanding that education is the single most important ingredient necessary to neutralize those forces that breed poverty and despair. You can change the world but first – you must change your mind”.

LISTEN: http://www.spreaker.com/show/the_john_t_wills_show

thank you

John T. Wills


A Great Show!

marchToday all eyes were on Washington as a celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the “March on Washington” for Jobs and Justice took place. August 28, 1963 marked a pivotal moment in America as the March on Washington, dubbed the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of the United States. No question a historic event which attracted more than 250,000 Americans demanding equality in jobs and civil rights.

Off the top, let me say that I think it was a great day back in August 1963 where people of all stripe came to Washington trying to obtain equal treatment under the law. Just in case anyone may have forgotten – America’s extreme racial practices were worst than the system of Apartheid in South Africa or anywhere else in the world.

Comes now, on this day, August 23, 2013, most have proclaimed “how far we [Blacks] have come.” I can agree in some sense but I will say that if we have come so far – why are we marching? Also, in my opinion, marching is a strategy not a solution. The few adjustments to the laws, overtime, have been taken away. We face the same issues the original organizers who marched fifty-years ago. As I see it “just as sure as things change they remain the same”.

I called the march a great show because there was much collective talk about the need for a continued effort to seek what should be granted in the first place. Therefore, I fear the same show will return to the same venue in fifty-years.

I will start and end the discussion of what was meant by the so-called dream right here. In the all mighty living document – the Constitution – it says clearly that Negroes are 3/5’s human and to this day no amendment has been added to change that to make blacks whole and thereby full citizens. Therefore, the so-called dream will never be realized unless and until this is done. So the cause of truth and justice should start there!

On this day that most are celebrating and singing “We Shall Overcome Someday”. The question is “what day and in whose lifetime”. I will leave you with this and pray that in fifty-years there will be no need for a March for Job’s and Justice. And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…

John T. Wills with “That Literary Lady 


The Mis-Educated Negro

My friends tell that I have been here before which is why I see things the way I do. I think what they mean by that kind of remarks is that I see things from a Thought Provoking Perspective. If, by chance, that statement is true in one of my past lives I once taught a college course where “The Mis-Education of the Negro,” was the class text. I realized that this was the most profound novel ever written on the thinking of the African American Diaspora.

It was such an amazing experience because of powerful messages revealed within the pages. Especially when you consider this great work was originally published in 1933 by Dr. Carter G. Woodson, who is known as and considered the father of Black History Month; this book should be mandatory reading for all African Americans – young and old.

As the class progressed and the assigned chapters were read I was struck by the fact that we have not understood the potent message left for us. The thesis of Dr. Woodson’s book is that Negroes of his day were being culturally indoctrinated rather than taught in American schools; actually, not even given the advantage of education. This conditioning, he claims, causes African Americans to become dependent, seeking out inferior places in the greater society of which they are a part. This assertion is clearly evident – nearly eighty years later.

He challenged his readers to become empowered by doing for themselves, regardless of what they were taught: “History shows that it does not matter who is in power… those who have not learned to do for themselves and have to depend solely on others never obtain any more rights or privileges in the end than they did in the beginning.”

Today with all the advantages concerning educational opportunities, business exposure, social networking, and a president who looks like us; we are in the best position to succeed than at any time in our history. So the obvious question is “why are we not?” Every other ethnic community takes advantage of their options to strengthen and empower their communities while, sadly, robbing our communities in the process. We will let anybody set up shop in our communities and take our money.

My point is: We must learn to do business with each other in order to gain wealth by keeping our money in our communities. Some say we spend trillions annually and nearly all of it leaves our community within 15 minutes. Let me remind you that the definition of insanity is to continue to do the same things and expect different results. We can change the world, but first we must change ourselves.

Here is a quote from the “The Mis-Education of the Negro”:

“When you control a man’s thinking you do not have to worry about his actions. You do not have to tell him not to stand here or go yonder. He will find his ‘proper place’ and will stay in it. You do not need to send him to the back door. He will go without being told. In fact, if there is no back door, he will cut one for his special benefit.”

It is time to build upon what was left for us or more importantly “know where you came from to know where you’re going, if we are ever going to get there.”

And that is my Thought Provoking Perspective!

Black History Everyday because Black History is American History.

“Just a Season”

Visit: http://johntwills.com

AMAZON

Legacy – A New Season the sequel is coming!


%d bloggers like this: