Tag Archives: murders

Organ Harvesting: The White Man’s Secret

1-We know and history is very clear about the evils of white folks and their history shows they have committed the most carnage on the planet. What I mean to say is that they will sell dog crap if there is a market or money to be made. We know as black people that they are inferior because they are more susceptible to diseases. Therefore, we can assume that their organs wear out and need to be replaced more frequently than other folk. Therefore, organs need to be found to fill that need and who do you think is expendable – black people.

Let’s look back to slavery, we saw the black woman nursing white babies – why; for the minerals that exist in her milk! Fast forward to today, there are thousands of black people who go missing every year never to be found. Also, your local mortuary may be complicit in this scheme to steal organs as well. During your visit to see you loved one who has expired, you see marks and scars on the body; due to your emotion state, you assume that they are from an autopsy – right. You never think or can look inside the body to see if the organs are there? There have been cases where black bodies were stuffed with newspapers.

The organ trade is all encircled in secret, which means the stealing of human organs business is a crime – someone must die for the tissues or other body parts to be used for the purpose of transplant to those rich people still living; so they can use to continue to live. There is a global need or demand for healthy body parts for transplantation, far exceeding the number of available donors. It is reported to be a waiting list of over a hundred thousand people waiting for a new organ in the United States alone. On average, an individual will wait three to five years for an organ to become available for transplant, which means there is a huge shortage of organs available.

Therefore, many countries view this epidemic as in the stealing of organs a commercial trade in human organs. The legal status of organ trade, however, is changing around the world. Trade in human organs is illegal in many jurisdictions in a number of ways and for various reasons, though organ trafficking is widespread. The data on the extent of the black market is difficult to obtain but we know thousands of black people go missing every year in America and there are people who prey on the helpless in times of disaster. Like during the earthquake in Haiti.

Most nations have some form of legislation meant to prevent the illegal trading of organs, whether by an outright ban or through legislation that limits how and by whom donations can be made. Most states have an option on your driver’s license that allows you to donate your organs and there are states like Wisconsin providing tax deductions to living donors. Let me be clear, this is a black market that is a white only club. Black people are merely the victims.

For example, in Iran where there are legal markets; the price of a kidney ranges from $2,000 to $4,000. On the black market, however, the price may be above $160,000, most of which is taken by middlemen. Additionally, when done through black market-affiliated medical providers, the transplant operation is dangerous to both the donor and recipient but the organs of choice are from black people. The typical price paid to donors on the black market is thought to be about $5,000, but some donors receive as little as $1,000.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), illegal organ trade occurs when organs are removed from the body for the purpose of commercial transactions. The WHO has stated that “Payment for… organs is likely to take unfair advantage of the poorest and most vulnerable groups, undermines altruistic donation and leads to profiteering and human trafficking.” Despite ordinances against organ sales, it was estimated that 5% of all organ recipients had engaged in black market organs for transplants.

Research indicates that illegal organ stealing is on the rise, with a recent report by Global Financial Integrity estimating that the illegal organ trade generates profits between $600 million and $1.2 billion per year, which span over many countries. These countries include, but are not limited to black people but the poor.

This is a very disturbing act upon humanity but if you are worth millions or billions why not kill a black person, take the organ you need so you can live. The history of these people shows how deviant and merciless from what has been documented; the murders of million and raping Africa! In fact, when you put on your driver license want to be an organ donor – you make yourself pray! I submit all of the drive by shootings and murders are not an accident – it is done with a more sinister reason. And that is my thought provoking perspective…


The History Of Thanksgiving

2The Holiday Season is upon us, and Thanksgiving is a special day to enjoy with family and friends. It welcomes the transition from Fall to Winter and the marvels it brings. A time of joy and hope! I have said many times “nothing is as it seems,” as the truth or true history is never told or taught with regard to what really happen or how it is that we celebrate most holidays. Therefore, as we enjoy the graciously prepared food on this day; think about the real history of Thanksgiving.

Let’s go back in time. It was in September 1620 when a tiny ship called the Mayflower left Plymouth, England, carrying 102 passengers of an assorted cast of religious separatists or as we might call them today – religious zealots. They set out seeking a new home where they could freely practice their faith with individuals lured by the promise of prosperity and land ownership in the New World.

The journey across the Atlantic was treacherous and an uncomfortable crossing that lasted sixty-six days before they dropped anchor near Cape Cod, far north of their intended destination at the mouth of the Hudson River. After about a month, the Mayflower crossed Massachusetts Bay where the Pilgrims, as they are now commonly known, began the work of establishing a village at Plymouth. They saw that there were no fences, so the thought the land was theirs for the taking, and they did just that – took it.

The first winter was brutal causing most of the colonists to remain on board the ship, where they suffered from exposure, scurvy, and outbreaks of contagious disease. Only half of the Mayflower’s original passengers and crew lived to see their first spring in the so-called new world. It wasn’t until spring that the remaining settlers moved ashore, where they received an astonishing visit from an Abenaki Indian, who greeted them in English. Shortly after that, he returned with another Native American, Squanto, a member of the Pawtuxet tribe.  Squanto had been kidnapped by an English sea captain and sold into slavery before escaping to London returning to his homeland on an exploratory expedition.

Squanto was the person who taught the Pilgrims, who were starving and sick, how to cultivate corn, extract sap from maple trees, catch fish in the rivers and avoid poisonous plants. He also helped the settlers forge an alliance with the Wampanoag, a local tribe, which would endure for more than 50 years and tragically remains one of the sole examples of harmony between European colonists and Native Americans.

In November 1621, after the Pilgrims’ first corn harvest proved successful, Governor William Bradford organized a celebratory feast and invited a group of the fledgling colony’s Native American allies, including the Wampanoag chief Massasoit. This is the beginning of what is now remembered as American’s “first Thanksgiving”; although the Pilgrims themselves may not have used the term, at the time, history reports that the festival lasted three days.

As you can imagine, there is no record of the historic banquet’s exact menu, the Pilgrim chronicler Edward Winslow wrote in his journal that Governor Bradford sent four men on a “fowling” mission in preparation for the event and that the Wampanoag guests arrived bearing five deer. Historians have suggested that many of the dishes were likely prepared using traditional Native American spices and cooking methods. Because the Pilgrims had no oven and the Mayflower’s sugar supply had dwindled by the fall of 1621, the meal did not feature pies, cakes or other desserts, which have become a hallmark of contemporary celebrations.

What most people don’t know it that after that Thanksgiving was not celebrated each year, rather it was a celebration had after a major victory resulting from a battle in a war. It was not until the Civil War that Abraham Lincoln did the holiday become a national holiday celebrated each year. Today as with all holidays, it has become an economic extension of capitalism. In spite of its history, I wish you and yours a safe and blessed day. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


The Day Innocence Died: Jim Garrison

4Jim Garrison is quoted as saying, “telling the truth can be a scary thing sometimes.” In 1963, Garrison was the New Orleans District Attorney of Orleans Parish. Three days after President Kennedy was assassinated he arrested David Ferrie as a possible associate of Lee Harvey Oswald and turned the investigation over to the FBI.

In the fall of 1966, Garrison reopened his investigation into the JFK assassination, after speaking with U.S. Senator Russell Longfrom Louisiana. Long told Garrison that it was his opinion that Oswald could not have acted alone. Garrison soon connected Oswald to Guy Banister, David Ferrie, and Clay Shaw.

During the summer of 1963, Oswald worked in Banister’s office and was seen with Clay Shaw and David Ferrie in New Orleans and Clinton, LA. In March of 1967, Jim Garrison arrested and charged New Orleans International Trade Mart director Clay Shaw with complicity in the murder of President Kennedy. To see a brief summary of Clay Shaw’s trial and his life, click on the link Clay Shaw.

Oliver Stone’s movie JFK mocks the doubtful veracity of the Warren Commission’s findings on the Kennedy assassination and summarizes some of the myriad theories that have been proposed. Focusing on the investigation by New Orleans DA Jim Garrison into the activities of the FBI and other government agencies as well as their attempted cover-ups, Stone weaves fact and speculation into a compelling argument for the reopening of the case files.

Jim Garrison died believing the assassination was a conspiracy and authored several books; one being “On The Trail of The Assassins”. Garrison was with the FBI, a district attorney, and from 1978-88 he was Judge of the Court of Appeal in New Orleans. Yet, we are told that the man was a paranoid fantasist, a publicity hound and a crooked DA.

Garrison was resurrected in Oliver Stone’s “JFK”. In the film, Garrison, played by Kevin Costner, is the archetypal underdog, a hero who sacrifices everything in search of truth. Although there are two contrasting views of the man, I will agree with Garrison in that the truth can be scary, although it is never as frightening as the lasting power of a good lie.

It seems reasonable that the only man to bring anyone to trial for the murder of the president of the United States is a hero and that an error in judgment or otherwise can only be corrected by fixing it by revealing the truth.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this series is that of the presenters and does not necessarily reflect the views of the author. It is information that is in the public domain provided for the reader to form an opinion. Whereas, it is the author’s position that the most profound sin is a tragedy unremembered and the absence of truth. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

A full documentary as it happened!

Follow the series “The Day Innocence Died”…

Tomorrow “Who Done It?”


The Day Innocence Died: The Suspects

4The list of alleged suspects who may or may not be involved in the murder of JFK are many, although officially as far as the Warren Commission was concerned there was only one – Lee Harvey Oswald, which some say was a rush to judgment. The former secretary of President John F. Kennedy made a list of suspects she believed were behind his assassination immediately after he was gunned down in Texas.

The JFK assassination in 1963 has long been the subject of conspiracy theories, ranging from those behind the murder to doubts about the lone assassin theory. But even before those conspiracies were aired Lincoln had her own suspicions. She was riding in the motorcade with Kennedy when he was shot dead allegedly by Lee Harvey Oswald in Dallas, Texas that day.

As Evelyn Lincoln, Kennedy’s personal secretary flew home on Air Force One that day she jotted down the names of those she suspected of involvement in the killing. The suspects that topped her list were Richard Nixon and the country’s vice president Lyndon Johnson. Johnson was sworn in only a few hours after the murder that shocked the world.

Lincoln jotted down the names of people she suspected who could have been behind the killing. Other suspects on her list were Teamsters boss Jimmy Hoffa, the KKK, Dixiecrats, the John Birch Society, South Vietnam President Ngo Dinh Diem, CIA in Cuban fiasco, Dictators and Communists. Few in the public have ever seen this note. On the back of the list is another note, written more than 20 years later when she passed on her letters to Kennedy collector Robert White.

‘There is no end to the list of suspected conspirators to President Kennedy murder. Many factions had their reasons for wanting the young president dead. That fact alone illustrates how the world suffers from a congenital proclivity to violence,’ it reads.

The 10-month Warren Commission set up to investigate the assassination concluded that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone in assassinating the president. There are many others including Mrs. Lincoln who thought differently, because it shows she believed from the very beginning “this dog just don’t hunt”. The video’s below talks about other suspects – take a moment to view – you decide.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this series is that of the presenters and does not necessarily reflect the views of the author. It is information that is in the public domain provided for the reader to form an opinion. Whereas, it is the author’s position that the most profound sin is a tragedy unremembered and the absence of truth. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

More to come on “The Day The Dream Died”…


The Day Innocence Died: Umbrella Man

5The JFK assassination is full of mysteries, untruths and some say lies. One of the strangest things that happened in Dealey Plaza on November 22nd was a man standing holding an umbrella on this clear sunny day just before the motorcade came into the kill zone. Kennedy assassination experts profess that it was opened just before the shots were fired. They say when he closed it the gun fire began. This man came to be known as the “Umbrella Man” and his curious behavior at the scene of the JFK assassination has lingered for fifty odd years.

Was this fellow, standing in Dealey Plaza with an open umbrella with no rain in sight part of the conspiracy? Here are two video’s that captures umbrella man from the NOVA documentary: Here is the first one, and here is the second. It is worth mentioning that some conspiratorialists claim that the umbrellas are different, having a different number of spokes. Decide for yourself.

What was the point of an umbrella in Dealey Plaza? It is said that it was an attempt to heckle Kennedy as a reminder of the appeasement policies of British Prime Minister Nevill Chamberlain, whose weak posture toward Hitler was supported by Kennedy’s father.

One of the more bizarre theories about the Umbrella Man comes from Robert Cutler. Cutler claimed that the umbrella was a weapon firing a flechette (poisoned dart) that hit Kennedy in the throat, paralyzing Kennedy to set him up for the head shot. Here is Cutler’s drawing of this concept.

There was also another man with Umbrella Man that day that came to be known as the so-called “Dark Complected Man”. He was named that because his complexion was his most readily identifiable feature in photos from November 22. The Dark Complected Man is without question an extremely important character and maybe even more deserving of scrutiny than Umbrella Man.

Dark Complected Man, like Umbrella Man, was on the Grassy Knoll, and, like Umbrella Man, appears to reasonable observers to have been signaling. At the precise moment that JFK’s car passed the Umbrella Man opened and pumped his umbrella repeatedly while the Dark Complected Man shot his fist up into the air. To some, this man seemed to be calling for a halt to the presidential limo, which did in fact either come to a complete halt or slowed down to a crawl.

It’s not just their actions at the moment that Kennedy’s head is blown apart. It’s how they behave afterwards. You will see from the videos below that both acted very different than everyone else after the shooting.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this series is that of the presenters and does not necessarily reflect the views of the author. It is information that is in the public domain provided for the reader to form an opinion. Whereas, it is the author’s position that the most profound sin is a tragedy unremembered and the absence of truth. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/dealey.htm

“The Day The Dream Died”…


The Unheralded Donald Goines: AKA “Al C. Clark”

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In the long history of black people in America, there have been many who were successful at certain crafts. Most often, many have been robbed of their achievements, unheralded, or die before their time. One such person that fits this description was Donald Goines. He grew up in what was considered, at the time, an affluent family in Detroit and found himself crippled with addiction, shot and killed mysteriously to end his short life.

Donald Goines became a prolific African American writer who wrote sixteen novels under his own name and his pseudonym “Al C. Clark” in his brief literary career. During his three years of service in US Air Force, he became a heroin addict while stationed in Korea and Japan, a monkey on his back that clung to him when he rejoined civilian life in 1955. Eventually, the monkey was demanding a c-note’s (one-hundred dollars) worth of junk a day.

Unable to get straight, it was hard to fly right with such a burden, even for an ex-air man. Like many addicts, Goines turned to crime to support his “jones”. In addition to theft and armed robbery, he also engaged in bootlegging, numbers running and pimping. In and out of jail, he was incarcerated for a total of six and one-half of the first 15 years after leaving the service. He wrote his first two novels during that time.

While wearing prison stripes, he tried his hand at writing Westerns, but he was uninspired by the genre. However, he found his muse when he discovered the writings of the ultra-cool Iceberg Slim, the legendary pimp, and raconteur. Iceberg Slim’s works such as his seminal “Pimp” inspired Goines to write the semi-autobiographical “Whoreson,” a novel about a Mack born to his trade as the son of a street-walker. “Whoreson” was released in 1972 by Slim’s publisher, Holloway House, which specialized in African American works. It was his second published novel, after 1971s “Dopefiend: The Story of a Black Junkie.”

Goines was released from the jail in 1970. At which time, he began writing at a frantic pace for the next four years allotted to him in this vale of tears; publishing 16 paperback originals with Holloway House. Still addicted to junk, Goines was disciplined enough to keep to a strict schedule, writing in the morning before giving over the rest of his day to letting his habits quick-silvery hands control his being.

Writing at a furious pace, he could turn out a novel in as little as a month. His style is unpolished, his syntax rough, and his words literally depended on the language of the streets shot through with black dialect (Ebonics). His novels are about people he knew; pimps, ho’s, thieves, hitters and dope fiends, struggling to survive in a ghetto jungle beset with merciless predators. The books were written for an audience to whom violence was or had been a part of life; not something wholly fictional.

The novels he published under his own name are about the “lumpenproletariat,” the criminal underclass. Under the name “Al C. Clark,” Goines wrote five novels about a revolutionary black cat called Kenyatta. Unlike Goines’ gangstas, Kenyatta, named after the great African freedom fighter Jomo Kenyatta, takes an active stance against exploitation and the depredations of inner-city life. He opposes the Establishment and was a sworn enemy of white cops. The head of a black militant organization dedicated to the Herculean task of douching out the ghettos of drugs and prostitution, Kenyatta is killed in a shootout in the last book of the series, “Kenyatta’s Last Hit” (1975).

Between five and ten million of Goines books have been sold, though his work did not receive much critical attention until the hip hop generation, which he influenced, became a cultural phenomenon. Goines’ books have inspired gangsta rappers from Tupac Shakur to Noreaga as a new generation of rap-influenced African Americans adopted the long-gone writer as part of their cultural heritage. Goines’ works reflect the anger and frustration of African Americans as a people. The hip-hop generation was sympathetic and accepted of Goines’ rejection of the values of white society.

While hip-hop as an art form cannot be considered a direct descendant of writers like Goines or Iceberg Slim, they did have a major influence on gangsta rappers. Nas and Royce Da 5′ 9″ both have songs called, “Black Girl Lost,” which is the title of a Goines book.

The ultimate tragedy of Goines life was when he and his wife were shot to death on October 21, 1974, under circumstances that remain a mystery. Some people believe they were killed in a drug deal that went wrong. Their grandson, Donald Goines III, who himself was murdered in 1992, blames part of the destruction of young African American lives that had not abated. Since long before the founding of the Republic, a country whose Constitution deemed African Americans as 3/5ths of a person for the purpose of establishing the apportionment of Congressional representation but did not give them any legal or social rights.

Thirty years after his death, Donald Goines’s novels are as relevant as they were in the early 70s, offering a picture of a lifestyle immersed in violence, sex, and drugs. It’s a life – often sacrificed to the exigencies of the street – that has since become glamorized and more appealing for a new generation of African Americans and white “wiggah” wannabes due to the mainstream commercialization of gangsta rap by urban media moguls more concerned with “Big Buck$” than social justice. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…

Mini Biography By: Jon C. Hopwood

12-Dopefiend: The Story of a Black Junkie, 1971
-Whoreson: The Story of a Ghetto Pimp, 1972
-Black Gangster, 1972
-Black Girl Lost, 1973
-Street Player, 1973
-White Man’s Justice, Black Man’s Grief, 1973
-Daddy Cool, 1974
-Crime Partners, 1974
-Eldorado Red, 1974
-Never Die Alone, 1974
-Swamp Man, 1974
-Cry Revenge!, 1974 (as Al C. Clark, Kenyatta series)
-Death List, 1974 (as Al C. Clark, Kenyatta series)
-Kenyatta’s Escape, 1974 (as Al C. Clark, Kenyatta series)
-Kenyatta’s Last Hit, 1975 (as Al C. Clark, Kenyatta series)
-Inner City Hoodlum, 1975


Gun Control: America No Longer Civilized

gun

Let me first offer my heartfelt prayers and deepest sympathy to the parents and families of those who have lost loved ones due to senseless gun violence. Many have cried and felt much pain, mainly because the government does absolutely nothing to stop these obviously insane shooters. Most people have no idea as to the pain felt by parents that have lost a child, it is the worst pain in life. I have felt and know that pain.

I saw a comment on Twitter that said, “Guns don’t kill people. People kill people.” This person would not have said such a crazy thing if it was a member of his family or child. Then there is the National Rifle Association (NRA), a leading gun rights advocate, the modern day Klan, strongly supports such thinking! Let’s remember that there have been shooting after shooting – death in rising number in all manner of public venues. It’s not safe to go anywhere.

Another thing I’ve heard was “this is such a great suburban town” and “this does not happen here”. Not surprising, but urban families in cities and communities throughout the nation have been crying out for someone to do something about guns for as long as I can remember. In urban communities’ children suffer Post Dramatic Stress Syndrome as a result of the combat like environments they suffer and witness daily.

I have experienced war firsthand and know that witnessing the brutality of death inflicted by another human – never leaves the minds consciousness. However, my point through this writing is to say, now that we have witnessed the many acts of mass murder committed by these young white killers in communities very different from the daily urban neighborhood deaths. Will the calls for America to begin a serious debate over gun regulation after the slaughter and shooting after shooting? No, they continue to blame it on the myth of “black on black crime”.

I guarantee the usual argument will ensue; the Second Amendment of the Constitution will be raised and the court rulings, which in my view wrongly rendered, have upheld or at least supported this contention. While the Supreme Court ruled in D.C. v. Heller that bans on handgun ownership was unconstitutional, the ruling gives the state and federal governments a great deal of latitude to regulate gun ownership. This means something can be done.

As the U.S. Second Court of Appeals put it in a recent ruling upholding a New York regulation, “The state’s ability to regulate firearms and, for that matter, conduct, is qualitatively different in public than in the home. Heller reinforces this view. In striking D.C.’s handgun ban, the Court stressed that banning usable handguns in the home is a ‘policy choice’ that is ‘off the table. But that a variety of other regulatory options remains available, including categorical bans on firearm possession in certain public locations.”

So, do we have to continue to endure the Gabby Gifford’s, Mr. Brady, shootings at malls, schools, colleges, and movie theaters, and see countless innocent murders before our government takes action? It is a sad state of affairs! These views are vastly different when color is applied. It is striking that if a black man kills someone – he is a menace to society. When a person from another country kills someone – that person is called a terrorist. But when a white man kills someone – he is mentally ill.

I don’t want to compare these incidents to the Stand Your Ground Laws, the many black unarmed people killed but the police, or any of the countless acts of gun crimes in recent memory. But it is time for the insanity to end. It is the government’s duty to make sense of the senseless, and a good start would be to begin immediately a real dialog leading to corrective action to protect the citizens of our nation.

Guns are made for one purpose, and that is to kill. Maybe, just maybe, if there were fewer guns, there might be fewer killings on the nation’s streets and in communities across the land. Frankly, is simply uncivilized for this to continue. And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…

How Americans actually feel about stronger gun laws


A Conversation On Race

Image1.I have thought long and hard about writing this post about the mythical concept of having a conversation about race as our president suggests. Personally, I am so tired of hearing after each brutal incident or racial issue that we are told to be non-violent and that this is a teachable moment.

Frankly, both are insulting! For example, do you think anything would have changed in Baltimore if the riots had not occurred? NO, it was the acts of violence that brought the media who told the story of the continued problem of race relations and the poverty that is compared to a third world country on American shores.

I can start and finish the conversation on race in one sentence. “Go to church on Sunday, look around as you worship, and you will realize that it is the most segregated hour and place in America.” How can you have a conversation with people who have you believing that the Savor looks like them!

I take issue with those from the right and those of the other hue who paint every African American as a thug, baby momma, or worst. Let me remind you that there are the hairs of the people during slavery that saw all Negroes as slaves: freeman or not – a view based on skin color.

In the 1960s, there were also people of that ilk when asked about the March on Washington said in overwhelming numbers that “Martin Luther Coon”, as they referred to him, was stirring up trouble. They said there was no problem with race. When, in fact, Negroes could not use the same toilet or drink out of the same water fountain.

I think it’s safe to say that every living soul can see that racism exists in our culture, particularly directed toward black men. From the beginning of the nation, by law, and laws decided by the Supreme Court expressed such as truth. How in God’s name can there be a conversation? I would compare them to those Whites who chose to die rather than admit that slavery was wrong and should end. Bill O, Sean H and those of the Fox News crowd who has ginned-up like minded people with the view that “there is nothing to see her”. Oh, let’s not forget the Drugster who has said he wants to refer to African Americans as “Niggers”.

Let’s be honest, the subject of race has been with us and against “us” from the day they wrote the Constitution. It was always intended that “Coloreds” be a nation of people living in a nation without a nationality. This is about “privilege” for those who have been the majority and know that it is threatened. As the country continues to evolve it is predicted that as soon as the next generation that privilege may soon end, which is why Voting Rights laws were gutted.

I can go on and on about the historical facts that are clear and present. They called it the building of a nation. We call it building a nation on our backs and through slavery meant we got nothing as a result. Just look at police misconduct and killing; it should show all people that “racism is here”. The fact is that it has been prevalent for the last four-hundred year with ample evidence to support this claim. Therefore, any so-called conversation will be like striking a match in a windstorm.

Therefore, the so-called conversation on race in any serious way is like striking a match in a windstorm. Any sense of a conversation is mute because white folk do not believe there is a problem – never have and never will, as they are the beneficiaries of this terrorist behavior. Or more simply put – nothing to see here!!! And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…


The Day Innocence Died – A Legacy Of Hope

41 horsemenJohn F. Kennedy was a forward thinking leader, who believed in a simple principle that government’s purpose was to do things for the greater good of its people. He was a man of vision who once said, “We chose to go to the moon and do other things not because they are easy, but because they are hard”. Kennedy was eloquent and charming, yet ruthless and determined, which may have been his demise. It is my view on November 22, 1963, fifty years ago, America’s best hope died and it was “The Day Innocence Died” .

Kennedy had the courage stand up to the mighty powers to save the world, bringing it back from the brink of destruction during the Cuban missile crisis. He was trying to pull the troops out of Vietnam, which had it happened, fifty-six thousand Americans troops killed and the many more wounded, would not have happened. Nor the suffering and devastation caused to the families of those Americans.

Kennedy had to deal with issues of the cold war and fight the hawks who wanted it to remain under the guise of communism. He was about to break up the CIA and remove Hoover as FBI Director; more significantly he planned to remove Johnson from the 1964 ticket. This man stood up to the powerful forces within the government with such extreme right wing thinking that was like characters of a horror movie.

Then there was the issue of race and Jim Crow that was more prevalent than at anytime since the Civil War.  He took it on with proposing aggressive legislative moves to address equality for those American citizens designated to second class citizenship within the most powerful nation in the world. Not to mention, his struggles with the backward and segregationist called Dixie-crates of the south, who were so ingrained in opposition to integration that you would have thought they were Klan members and many were cardholders.

In the interest of fairness, I must say with regard to race; he had no choice because of television. Actually, the race problem in America at the time was worse than the apartheid system in South Africa. Television brought the horrific coverage of Bull Connor putting dogs on peaceful protester down south on American streets into living rooms across the country nightly on the evening news, which was also broadcast around the world. This was a tumultuous year!

There was the March on Washington for jobs and freedom. There were also the actions of segregationists like George Wallace who stood in the doorway of an Alabama university to deny blacks, or colors as they were called then, access to higher education. Let’s not forget segregation at all levels of education and housing discrimination.

This was the year that Medar Evers was assassinated and on the very night of a speech given by Kennedy on the topic of race. In Birmingham, Alabama four innocent little black girl were killed in a church by a bomb planted by a racist. Dr. King was arrest and locked up in a Birmingham jail for his work in trying to achieve equality. There was Bloody Sunday a day where peaceful marchers were stampeded as they tried to cross a bridge into Selma, Alabama. These are just a few issues but at the time segregation was the law of the land.

President Kennedy embodied a vision of hope for America that spoke loudly to the heart of a man, as evidence by this remark “Things do not happen. Things are made to happen.” Translation; “leaders are not made they are born”. The point here is each of us is born with a purpose, and that is to die. However, a more significant purpose is what it is that do while we live. Could it be that he was born to die so that we could see? As horrible as Nixon was as president, resigning in disgrace ten years later, the world would have surely been much worse if he was elected in 1960.

It weighed heavily on my heart to write this commemorative piece to pay homage to the light that shined bright at a time when America was so dark, from my perspective as an African American. As I wrote this series of articles, I learned so much about the evils within the American body. Having lived through segregation, I witnessed how dangerous these evils were to everyone, particularly to African Americans, and the world.

Those evils remain today; we have the George Zimmerman’s and those who made him a hero. More troubling is the state of political discourse within our government, namely the Republicans and the Tea Party ilk that is not that much different from the Citizens Councils of old.

One thing that really surprised me as I researched the three week series “The Day Innocence Died”; there were countless people that died or were killed who knew too much about the murder of Kennedy. There were also many who benefited significantly that were presumed to be related in some way with or to the cover-up. Did you know that there were four presidents elected after the assassination that were mentioned by some researchers and experts as being connected or possibly involve in the death of Kennedy; Johnson, Ford, Nixon, and Bush that may well be the bigger sin [if true].

I can only imagine if President Kennedy could speak to us today. I believe, he would say:

“Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future… Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable… Geography has made us neighbors. History has made us friends. Economics has made us partners, and necessity has made us allies… The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie, deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive and unrealistic.” Actual words spoken by John F. Kennedy

It is my hope that you gained more knowledge about “The Day Innocence Died”; America Died! What we learned is that the most profound sin is a tragedy unremembered and the absence of truth. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


Tis’ The Season

rip

I have re-posted this piece every year for the past ten years to share my pain for the loss of my son. I know we are born to die but as each Christmas comes and goes I miss his presence. During this season, we rejoice with great celebration for Christmas is the day Christ our savior was born. Rarely do I share much of my personal being but in this post I want to pour my heart out because this is neither my favorite season nor one that I look forward to anymore. It is not due to a lack of faith or my strong conviction and belief in someone greater than I; whom I call chose to call God. Rather, it is due to this event that will forever pain my heart.

Every year as the holiday season comes upon us I have to relive a dreadful horror. So I ask that you please forgive any tears that may stain the pages as I write. If you have experienced the greatest love of all and lost it. I know you feel my pain. Therefore, I will use this writing to express my feelings and pay homage to my late son – who I miss very much. I am blessed in that he left me a wonderful grandson who I cherish more than life itself.

It’s been some time since God called my only son home to be with him, and the pain of his absence does not go away. No parent should have to bury a child, let alone the only child they’ve been blessed to have. It just doesn’t seem right for a child to go before a parent, but this is not something that is unique to me. I know from scripture that others have endured such pain since time began. Able died before Adam and Eve and John the Baptist died preceding his parents. We also know for certain that Jesus died before Mary because she witnessed his crucifixion, and how painful that must have been.

It was a dreadful dreary cold day about ten years ago, early in the morning, when I lost my Rashad due to a tragic automobile accident. It was without question the worst thing imaginable and most certainly my darkest hour. This pain never seems to subside, and I will tell you during each Christmas season it is still painful. Adding to the sadness of this situation his death occurred on New Year’s Eve and on the morning of his son’s first birthday as we were preparing a birthday party for my grandson.

This brings to mind words from scripture. Actually, it is a question I was asked a long time ago. “Why Jesus wept?” As the story goes, Jesus was so moved as he witnessed the pain of Mary and Martha weeping for the loss of his dear friend, Lazarus, that he also wept. Today, I understand that emotion because I have felt such pain. I wrote a few books which might very well explain why I was chosen as the vehicle to share such a powerful story within those pages that will surely live far beyond the season I’ve been given.

From this nightmare, I have come to understand that adversity can either destroy or develop you. Unless and until you have suffered enough pain, then and only then, will you reach deep inside and feel the breath that God has breathed into your soul coming eye to eye with your destiny. Now, having said that, my salvation was to take this lemon (for lack of a better word) and make lemonade. What I have learned from this tragedy is that there is a definition of service that is not written in Webster’s Dictionary that says “I can heal by giving of myself to the benefit of others.”

In spite of this never before known pain that resides permanently within my soul I am very grateful God saw fit to bless me with a wonderful grandson whose name is Elijah. So as each year passes and Elijah resembles my son more and more the pain eases and the season becomes more bearable. I pray that my son is rejoicing in the bosom of our Lord knowing that I am here for his son in his stead. I am looking forward to the day when I see him again so we can walk around haven all day reveling in wonders of God’s kingdom.

The tears are flowing uncontrollably now. So I will close by saying to anyone experiencing adversity whether it is from health, financial issues or the pain of missing a loved one. I offer my deepest sympathy to you, particularly those who have joined this unwelcomed fraternity of losing a child. The Christmas holiday season and welcoming the New Year will never be the same.

Jesus said, “I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in me will live, even though he dies; and whoever… believes in me will never die.” John 11:25-26

And that is my Thought Provoking Perspective…

 R.I.P.

“RASHAD ALI WILLS”

Make these books the gift that keeps on giving.

Legacy – A New Season 

AMAZON

Just a Season


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