Tag Archives: sports

How Much Do You Support Colin Kaepernick

GUFJZwTHXUlOOuD-800x450-noPadMost of the black people I know have an opinion about everything Colin Kaepernick protest and now he is being blackballed. It all began because of what began on August 26, 2016, San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick sat down during the national slave anthem (National Anthem) before the 3rd preseason game of the upcoming 2016 NFL season.  Afterwards he made a bold statement:

“I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color. To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder.”

Not since the great Muhammad Ali’s who refused to serve in the Vietnam War has any one made a conscious decision by an athlete taking such a direct stance highlighting the injustices of black  people; just like Ali, the reaction to Kaepernick’s stance has been met with passionate responses, often times divided by the color line. White people, of course, they are incensed!

I will proudly say, I am very proud of the man because he risked everything for what he believes and uses his money to backup that belief. Since his protest to a take a knee, he has donated millions to charity toward racial issues. Most of you would not give a homeless man a cup of coffee. However, it has caused many of the million dollar slaves, past and present, to have a mostly negative opinion on the matter – some shameless, I might add!

Best of all, Kaepernick’s protest made the conversation about “racial/police brutality” front-page for the large part of the NFL season, a feat never done before in its history. This is a good thing and most should support the issue of injustice. He made his decision without counsel of any of these people and was brave enough to stand by it. I remember what saw with Muhammad Ali; they stripped him of the championship title, did not allow him to box, and hurt his family. See what they do! End the end history proved that he was correct.

So the owners have black balled Colin. I see your post shared on all over social media. Is that the limit of your support? If that is so – all you are doing is talking loud and saying nothing! I can remember people, black people, did the same in Ali’s case; whisper amongst themselves and did nothing. Or I remember that black people dared not mention the name Malcolm X – let alone be in the same place with him.

If you are appalled by this, then show your power by boycotting the NFL until Kaepernick gets signed to a team or at least given a fair chance. This means to not watch any games, no social media comments about your favorite team before/during/after the games, don’t attend the stadiums, and don’t buy any merchandise which represents the league or your favorite team.

We also understand the purpose of Colin Kaepernick’s protest is FAR more important than any of the games you will ever watch. Simply put, if things stay the same for the way America — where “all men are created equal” — treats people of color, then your loved ones, friends, and children will eventually be affected as well.

Finally, all of us must remember that the NFL never wanted black people to play the game. The Colin Kaepernick situation really shines a light on how much the NFL really cares about the 90% of its Black athletes and you! So if you are not contributing to the problem – shut up! And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


The Greatest Pitcher Never Known

I was listening to the Tom Joyner Morning Show and I must say it is a great source of empowerment for our community – thank you Mr. Joyner and the crew. He has a thing once a week called the Little Known Black History Fact. This particular fact got my attention because I am a huge fan of the players who have been virtually erased from the book of history or at least His-Story.

Sure we know Jackie Robinson and Satchel Paige but that is about the extent of our knowledge of a game African Americans championed. We this story was about the man referred to as “The Greatest Pitcher Never Known” and his name was Will “Cannonball” Jackman. Jackman joined the Boston Colored Giants in the 1924-1925 season and played ball until he was well into his sixties. He won more than half of the 1,200 games he pitched over 20 years, with nearly 800 strikeouts and more than 40 shutouts. His record was 52 and 2.

Sometimes nicknamed the “Satchel Paige of New England,” it was reported that Will Jackman earned $175 a game and $10 per strikeout. But later in his career, he reportedly received $500-$800 for playing against white semi-pro teams in the exhibition games. This was only a portion of what the white players received, but on the high end for most black players. Jackman’s worth, however, was said to be more than the combination of several white players; New York Giants coach John McGraw was recorded saying he would “pay $50,000 to the man who could make Jackman white.”

The actual date of his birth was stated between 1897 or 1899 in Carta, Texas. He may have found his love of baseball while watching the nearby spring training camp of the New York Giants in San Antonio. Jackman started playing with the Houston Black Buffalos, drifting to Maryland and New York before actually joining the Boston Colored Giants in 1925.

Although he was payed for his crowd-appealing pitches, Will Jackman took a side job as a chaffuer to send money to his family, keeping his job during the off seasons and well into retirement.

The Negro League pitcher left a trail of strikeouts while playing with teams in Texas, Oklahoma, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Massachusetts. Throughout his career, Will Jackman went on to play for the Philadelphia Giants, the Philadelphia Tigers, the Brooklyn Eagles, the Newark Eagles, and the Boston Royal Giants. In the 1952 Pittsburgh Courier’s player-voted poll of the “all-time great Negro League players,” Will Jackman was voted number one.

When the Boston Red Sox were scouting for African-American players to finally join their roster in the 1950’s, they looked to Will “Cannonball” Jackman for guidance and recruiting.

Will “Cannonball” Jackman died on September 8, 1972 surrounded by friends and family. In his honor, the Cannonball Foundation, an organization that promotes baseball play among youth in low-income urban communities, was formed.

This was, I thought, an amazing story of one of the greatest to ever play the game and because he received no acclaim I want to say I honor you, and thank you. And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…

Source: The Little Known Black History Fact
TJMS

http://johntwills.com


Some People Just Don’t Understand

16266194_1576646812351280_7451924563813283492_nThere are two schools of thought when it comes to matters of race. By that, I mean those who benefitted from such institutions of racial degradation, past and present, and those who are subjected to it. Institutions such as slavery, Jim Crow, and other forms of segregation, for example, will say “why don’t you people forget it”! All the while other folk cling to what they call their heritage; i.e. the holocaust and the rebel flag. I have never heard any of these folk say anything that would suggest that they have forgotten any of those horrible crimes inflicted on them or things that happened to them. The more disturbing fact is that they or the system has brainwashed many black people into agreeing with their point of view. Case in point, the million dollar slaves of today. In the following video clip, it is explained perfectly. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


Remembing Jackie Robinson: The Magic of #42

1aThere are moments in time where time itself demands change. There was one such moment in the Spring of 1947 when an African American baseball player named Jackie Robinson stepped up to the plate and changed the face of sports. It is an honor for me to pay homage to Mr. Robinson whose character, stature, and integrity was beyond reproach.

Born January 31, 1919, in Cairo, Georgia, Jackie Robinson was the first African American to play in the so-called major leagues in more than fifty years. Throughout his decade-long career with the Brooklyn Dodgers, he made advancements for the cause of civil rights for black athletes. In 1955, he helped the Dodgers win the World Series. He retired in 1957, with a career batting average of .311.

Now, as is often the case with “His-Story”, much of what we know about history is a myth. Let me use one of my favorite quotes from the prolific French writer, historian, and philosopher Voltaire, who said: “History is a pack of trick we play upon the dead.” What I mean by that is this dynamic historical event actually was as simple as a black man being allowed to play a game with white people as a result of the rigid “Jim Crow” laws mandated by the law of the land.

At the time sports, as well as everywhere south of Canada was segregated. African Americans and whites played in separate leagues with Robinson, who played in the famed Negro Leagues. Robinson was chosen by Branch Rickey, a vice president with the Brooklyn Dodgers, to help integrate major league baseball. He joined the all-white Montreal Royals, a farm team for the Brooklyn Dodgers, in 1945. He moved to Florida in 1946 to begin spring training with the Royals and played his first game on March 17 of that same year.

His-Story tells us that Branch Rickey did this out of good conscience and for the cause of civil rights. Well, that is not exactly true. Rickey saw an opportunity to make money. The Negro league was prospering, and the white league was barely surviving. He knew if he could convince one Negro player to play for him, the others would follow, and they did. Hence, the Negro league ceased to exist. It is important to note that Robinson was not the best player in the Negro League. He was an average player but better than all of the white players playing in the white league at the time.

It is not my intention to neither demean nor take away from the significance of the huge step toward equality. Despite the racial abuse, particularly at away games, Robinson character prevailed as he endured the most brutal harassment, threats, and derogatory language hurled at him on and off the field. It is because of his superb character that we should celebrate this great man.

Jackie Robinson succeeded in putting the prejudice and racial strife aside and showed everyone what a talented player he was. In his first year, he hit 12 home runs and helped the Dodgers win the National League pennant. That year, Robinson led the National League in stolen bases and was selected as Rookie of the Year. He continued to wow fans and critics alike with impressive feats, such as an outstanding .342 batting average during the 1949 season. He led in stolen bases that year and earned the National League’s Most Valuable Player Award.

Robinson also became a vocal champion for African-American athletes, civil rights, and other social and political causes. In July 1949, he testified on discrimination before the House Un-American Activities Committee. In 1952, he publicly called out the Yankees as a racist organization for not having broken the color barrier five years after he began playing with the Dodgers.

In his decade-long career with the Dodgers, Robinson, and his team won the National League pennant several times. Finally, in 1955, he helped them achieve the ultimate victory: the World Series. After failing before in four other series match-ups; the Dodgers beat the New York Yankees. He helped the team win one more National League pennant the following season and was then traded to the New York Giants. Jackie Robinson retired shortly after the trade, on January 5, 1957, with an impressive career batting average of .311.

Let me close with what really happened that day – number 42 was just a number until Mr. Jackie Robinson wore it! And that’s my Thought Provoking Perspective…


In Memoriam: Remembering Those Who Transitioned In 2016

thLooking back at the year that was and remembering the long list of people that were famous, known nationally, and recognized; 2016 saw the deaths of an unusually long list of political titans and sports icons, famous musicians and Hollywood greats. There was the boxer nicknamed The Greatest, the musician known as Prince, the revolutionary leader Fidel Castro.

– Muhammad Ali, the heavyweight boxing champion who transformed himself into a global hero, died June 3 at 74. Ali, who fought a high-profile battle with Parkinson’s disease, died of septic shock.

– George Michael musician, front man for the group Wham.

– Natalie Cole, musician, daughter of the great Nat King Cole.

– Maurice White, songwriter, producer and founder of Earth, Wind, and Fire.

– The death of Fidel Castro, the cigar-chomping despot who ruled Communist Cuba for nearly half a century, sent shock waves around the world. Castro died Nov. 25 at 90.

– Prince, the 57-year-old singer, songwriter, hit maker was found dead in his Paisley Park, Minn., home on April 21.

– David Bowie, the British rocker whose sound and style defied categorization, died Jan. 10 after a secret battle with cancer. He was 69.

– John Glenn, who in 1962 was the first U.S. astronaut to orbit the Earth, and senator for 24 years, was 95.

– Miami Marlins pitcher Jose Fernandez died Sept. 25 when his speedboat slammed into a jetty near South Beach.

– Former First Lady Nancy Reagan died March 6 of congestive heart failure. She was 94.

– Janet Reno, the first woman to serve as U.S. attorney general, died Nov. 7 at age 78.

– Arnold Palmer, the gentleman golfer hailed as the King, died Sept. 25 at age 87.

– Gordie Howe, the 23-time NHL All-Star known as Mr. Hockey, died June 10 at 88.

– Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia was found dead at a Texas resort on Feb. 13.

– Former Israeli President and Prime Minister Shimon Peres, a winner of the Nobel Peace Prize for negotiating with the Palestinians, died Sept. 28 at 93.

– Keith Emerson, the keyboardist who founded Emerson, Lake and Palmer, died March 11.

– Greg Lake, 69, who was also a founding member of King Crimson, died Dec. 7.

– Actor Alan Thicke, 69, who played the father in the ’80s sitcom “Growing Pains,” died Dec. 13

– Florence Henderson, best known as quintessential TV mom Carol Brady in “The Brady Bunch,” died Nov. 24. She was 82.

– Comedian Garry Shandling died March 24, apparently of a heart attack. He was 66.

– Gene Wilder, whose four-decade acting career included unforgettable comic roles in “Blazing Saddles” and “Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory,” was 83 when he died Aug. 29.

– Patty Duke, who won an Oscar for “The Miracle Worker” and later played “identical cousins” on her own TV show, died March 29 at 69.

– Edward Albee, the playwright who penned “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” died Sept. 16 at age 88.

– Harper Lee, an author who shunned the spotlight and who penned “To Kill a Mockingbird,” died in her sleep Feb. 19 at age 89.

– Joe Garagiola, the baseball catcher and colorful TV announcer, died March 23 at 90.

– John McLaughlin, the political commentator and prickly host of TV’s “The McLaughlin Group,” died Aug. 16 at 89.

– Abe Vigoda, best known for playing mob capo Sal Tessio in “The Godfather” and as Detective Fish on “Barney Miller,” died Jan. 26 at 94.

– George Kennedy, who co-starred in “Cool Hand Luke,” “Airport” and “Naked Gun,” died Feb. 28 at 91.

– Garry Marshall, creator of TV’s “Happy Days” and “The Odd Couple,” died July 19 at 81.

– Robert Vaughn, who played a spy in the cult ’60s series “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.,” died Nov. 11 at age 83.

– Doris Roberts, a five-time Emmy-winner best known as the grandmother on TV’s “Everybody Loves Raymond,” died April 17 at 90.

– Ron Glass, the 71-year-old actor best known for his role in the TV sitcom “Barney Miller,” died Nov. 25.

– Phyllis Schlafly, an activist who fueled modern social conservativism by denouncing feminism, died Sept. 5 at 92.

– Harper Lee, author of “To Kill a Mockingbird”.

– Tom Hayden, the 1960s radical who was once married to Jane Fonda, died Oct. 23 at 76.

– Kenny Baker, the diminutive 81-year-old British actor who played the droid R2-D2 in six “Star Wars” films, died Aug. 13 after a long illness.

– Leonard Cohen, the legendary singer-songwriter, died Nov. 7 at 82.

– Singer Maurice White, songwriter, producer, and founder of Earth, Wind & Fire, died Feb. 3 at 74.

– Merle Haggard Country music outlaw died April 6 on his 79th birthday.

– Malik Taylor, the rapper with A Tribe Called Quest known as Phife Dawg, died March 22 due to complications from diabetes. He was 45.

– Glenn Frey, the rocker who co-founded the Eagles, died Jan. 18 at 67.

– Sharon Jones, lead singer of the Dap-Kings, died Nov. 18 at age 60.

– Attrell Cordes, known as Prince Be of the ’90s R&B duo P.M. Dawn, died June 17. He was 46.

– Pat Summitt, the former coach of the University of Tennessee’s Lady Volunteers who notched the most wins in NCAA basketball history, died June 28. She was 64.

– Craig Sager, the NBA sideline reporter known as much for his outrageous suits as his deep knowledge of the game, died Dec. 15. He was 65.

– ESPN broadcaster John Saunders, 61, passed away Aug. 10 after his wife found him unresponsive at their Westchester County home.

– Morley Safer, CBS journalist who filed more than 900 reports for “60 Minutes,” died May 19. He was 84.

– Gwen Ifill, the pioneering journalist who died Nov. 14. The 61-year-old co-anchor of “The PBS NewsHour”.

– Rob Ford, the ex-Toronto mayor died March 22 at 46.

– Elie Wiesel, the Holocaust survivor and Nobel Peace Prize winner, who died July 2 at 87.

– Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Egyptian statesman who became the United Nations’ sixth secretary general in the early 1990s, died Feb. 16. He was 93.

– Henry Heimlich, the surgeon who created the eponymous anti-choking technique, died Dec. 17 at 96.

– Alan Rickman, 69, the British actor, “Die Hard” and the Harry Potter movies, died Jan. 14

– Anton Yelchin, best known for playing a young Chekov in the reboot “Star Trek” films, died on June 19. He was 27.

– Zsa Zsa Gabor, a Hungarian model-turned-Hollywood socialite whose turbulent romances titillated the public long before the rise of celebrity reality shows, died Dec. 18 of a heart attack. Gabor, who wed nine times, was 99.

It was not my intention to leave out the many unarmed black men, women, and children for these horrible killings are far too many to list (shame); may they all rest in peace. And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


The Most Profound Photo In All Sports

The million dollar slaves today, called athletes, would not dare stand together for anything like these great men stood together for a cause. We need this type of conviction today!

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And that’s my thought provoking perspective…


Boxing Legend Leon Spinks Hospitalized In Serious Condition!

According to Spinks’ wife, Brenda, at this point, no one knows how long the former champ will be down for the count, but the family is optimistic. Champ, we wish you well!


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